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In: Paulus als interkultureller Vermittler
In: Paulus als interkultureller Vermittler
In: Paulus als interkultureller Vermittler
In: Paulus als interkultureller Vermittler
In: Paulus als interkultureller Vermittler
In: Paulus als interkultureller Vermittler
In: Paulus als interkultureller Vermittler
In: Journal of Ancient Judaism
Author: Jonathan Stökl

In this paper I examine three female prophets: Deborah (Judg 4–5), Huldah (2 Kgs 22 and 2 Chr 34), and Innibana (ARM 26 205). The focus is on how female prophets are constructed in these texts and contexts. For the scholar of the ancient Near East, Huldah looks like a familiar character, with the twist that her authority is constructed differently from that of non-biblical ancient Near Eastern prophets. Deborah’s combination of judge and prophet is even more noticeable in that regard. The construction of Deborah as a woman within Israelite society in that text is rather ambiguous. As I will argue, this ambiguity is characteristic of Second Temple construction of female prophecy.

Open Access
In: Journal of Ancient Judaism

This paper explores the ambiguous connection between women and prophecy in ancient Greece. The issue of the genealogy of the prophetic seat of Delphi – the most authoritative oracle of ancient Greece – is first dealt with in relation to Aeschylus’ Eumenides (458 B. C. E.), where the gift of prophecy is said to have been first endowed to Gaia, Mother Earth, to be passed on from mother to daughter until it is given to Apollo, the god of prophecy. Starting from this testimony, the role of Gaia is used in the paper as a key to understanding the motherly symbols associated with prophecy. The paper further explores how the powerful prophetic voice and role of the Pythia is “normalized” in the context of fifth century Athens, where women were not allowed to be public speakers or agents and where the dominant male voice constructed any public feminine voice as inappropriate or deviant. In this respect, the paper points out how in the Athenian representation of the Pythia, the authoritative heir of Gaia is reduced to a reconciling woman acting as a devout supporter of men and their authority.

Open Access
In: Journal of Ancient Judaism