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International Cooperation in Exile within the Assembly of Captive European Nations, 1954–1972
The book expands the history of the Cold War to Eastern European emigrants and their networks.
The “Assembly of Captive European Nations” was a major organisation for Eastern European emigrants in the US since 1954. The cooperation of exiled politicians from nine countries opened up for them new opportunities for lobbying and publications. This book focuses on Estonian contributions to the ACEN. Besides successes, the book reveals troublesome relations with the American authorities, schisms among Europeans and extended national disputes. The ACEN was quickly forgotten after its dissolution in 1972. Based on extensive archival research, this book reflects the ACEN’s aspirations and personalities.
A Specific Enclave in Contemporary Europe
The main objective of the book is a multi-aspect analysis of the functioning of the Kaliningrad Region in contemporary political reality, both in internal and international dimensions.

The area constitutes a unique enclave in contemporary Europe, being the only part of Russia separated from the mother country, which determines the taking place therein in the dimension of relations: bilateral, multilateral (e.g. EU - Russia, NATO - Russia, Baltic Sea Region cooperation) as well as regional and local cooperation. The book is a result of many years’ work of scientists from Poland, Russia and Sweden, who have been researching the functioning of the Kaliningrad Region in internal and external dimensions.

It is a ‘must to read’ volume for all EU-Russia observers and experts.” - Prof. Dr. Piotr Dutkiewicz, Director of the Center for Governance and Public Management, Carleton University, Ottawa, Canada
It is an invaluable guide to analysing and understanding contemporary Russia.” - Prof. Dr. Jaroslav Dvorak, Head of the Department of Public Administration and Political Sciences, Klaipėda University, Klaipėda, Lithuania
Topografie eines Diskurses
1918, am Ende des Ersten Weltkriegs, fanden die Deutschen nicht in den Frieden zurück. Die »Schmach von Versailles« trug wesentlich zum Aufstieg Hitlers und zum Ausbruch des Zweiten Weltkriegs 1939 bei. Welche Rolle spielte die Religion, als der Krieg in den Köpfen und in der Öffentlichkeit weitertobte? Das Buch beantwortet diese Frage am Beispiel Münchens: Hochburg des Katholizismus, mit starken evangelischen und jüdischen Minderheiten, und gleichzeitig »Hauptstadt der NS-Bewegung«. Kinder lernten den Krieg schon in der ersten Klasse. Totengedenkfeiern griffen die ehemaligen Kriegsgegner erneut an. Denkmäler und Friedhöfe heroisierten den toten Kämpfer und schrieben sein Vermächtnis. Wahlplakate und Karikaturen schürten die Aggression. Der Pazifismus hatte einen schweren Stand gegen Patriotismus und politische Justiz. Die Presse spiegelte und schürte ‚Volkes Stimme‘.
A Sourcebook
Volume Editors: Elena Marushiakova and Vesselin Popov
This ground-breaking book is an impressively extensive collection of primary historical sources in various languages that reflect the history of the Roma (formerly referred to as ‘Gypsies’ in local languages). The selection of the included materials reflects the authentic voice of the Roma them - selves, and presents their visions and the specific goals pursued by the Roma civic emancipation movement. The source materials are published in original and translated in English, and are accompanied by explanatory notes and summarising comments discussing the specific historical realities and their interrelation to the Romani emancipatory movement in Central and Eastern Europe, thus presenting a comprehensive picture of the historical processes.
Open Access
From the Baltics to Central, Eastern and South Eastern Europe 1944–1956
The end of the Second World war did not mean the end of violence for many regions in Eastern Europe. The establishment of Communist-led governments often met not only civil but also armed resistance. These actions were taken by partisan groups and paramilitary forces which in some cases had been formed already during the war to support axis forces. In other cases – like Poland’s Armia Krajowa – they fought Nazi and Soviet occupiers with the same fervour. The aims of the fighters were the end of Communist rule and – like in the Baltic region – independence from the Soviet Union. Difficulties in accessing sources and research taboos as well as a focus on other aspects of the Cold War are reasons why violent resistance in Europe after the Second World War is a topic yet rather underestimated and comparably little investigated by historiography. This book gives a comprehensive first overview of the ultimately futile attempts to end the rule of Moscow and her proxies.
The Second World War and Beyond
With the end of the Second World War, all its violence, war crimes, and sufferings as well as the atomic threat of the Cold War period, societies began to gradually remember wars in a different way. The glorious or honorable element of the age of nationalism was transformed into a rather dunning one, while peace movements demanded an end of war itself.
To analyze these changes and to show how war was remembered after the end of the Second World War, the present volume assembles the work of international specialists who deal with this particular question from different national and international perspectives. The contributions analyze the role of soldiers, perpetrators, and victims of different conflicts, including the Second World War. They show which motivational settings led to the erection of war memorials reflecting the values and historical traditions of the second half of the 20th and the 21st centuries. Thus, this interdisciplinary volume explores how war is commemorated and how its actors and victims are perceived around the globe.
Christopher R. Browning and Holocaust Historiography
Reflecting on the work of one of the field’s most influential scholars, the twenty essays in this book explore the evolution and application of Holocaust historiography, identify key insights into genocidal settings and point to gaps in our knowledge of humanity’s most haunting problem.Why do they kill?The publication in 1992 of Christopher R. Browning’s “Ordinary Men” raised crucial, previously unasked questions about the Holocaust: what made the members of a German police battalion – “middle-aged family men of working- and lower-class background” – become mass murderers of Jewish children, women, and men? How does motivation tie in with other factors that prompt participation in the “final solution”? And what can survivor accounts convey about genocide perpetration? Reflecting on the work of one of the field’s most influential scholars, the twenty essays in this book explore the evolution and application of Holocaust historiography, identify key insights into genocidal settings and point to gaps in our knowledge of humanity’s most haunting problem.
Die Antinapoleonischen Kriege in der deutschen Erinnerung
Author: Karen Hagemann
Dieses Buch erkundet die umkämpften deutschen Erinnerungen an die sogenannten Befreiungskriege gegen Napoleon (1813–1815) im langen 19. Jahrhundert. Die Zeit der Antinapoleonischen Kriege zwischen 1806 und 1815 nahm lange eine Schlüsselposition in der Geschichtsschreibung und im nationalen Gedächtnis des deutschsprachigen Raums ein, da die kollektive Erinnerung an diese Kriege eine zentrale Bedeutung für die Ausformung von konkurrierenden Vorstellungen der deutschen Nation und Nationalidentität hatte. Diese Erinnerung wurde nicht nur von politischen Interessen, sondern auch von regionalen, sozialen und geschlechtsspezifischen Differenzen geformt. Das Buch untersucht das umkämpfte Gedächtnis nicht nur anhand der populären, militärischen und akademischen Geschichtsschreibung, sondern auch sehr viel breitenwirksamerer Erinnerungsmedien wie Memoiren und Romane sowie kultureller Praktiken, insbesondere Feiern und Symbolen.
The Cultural Impact of the First World War
The battles of the First World War created a fundamentally new impression of war. Total warfare, the use of propaganda, chemical weapons, and every possible other measure to ensure victory defined the event that should later be known as the »Great War«, because it caused so many deaths and much suffering. The catastrophe also had an impact on the humanities, which inevitably had to deal with the processing of an event that seemed to be too big to be clearly understood by the human mind. The present volume covers several interdisciplinary perspectives by dealing with the impact of the war on the humanities during and after the conflict that deeply influenced the mindset of the 20th century.