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Z. Anthony Kruszewski in Wartime Europe and Postwar America
Author: Beata Halicka
Beata Halicka’s masterly narrated biography is the story of an extraordinary man and leading intellectual in the Polish-American community. Z. Anthony Kruszewski was first a Polish scout fighting in World War II against the Nazi occupiers, then a Prisoner of War/Displaced Person in Western Europe. He was stranded as a penniless immigrant in post-war America and eventually became a world-renowned academic.
Kruszewski’s almost incredible life stands out from his entire generation. His story is a microcosm of 20th-century history, covering various theatres and incorporating key events and individuals. Kruszewski walks a stage very few people have even stood on, both as an eye-witness at the centre of the Second World War, and later as vice-president of the Polish American Congress, and a professor and political scientist at world-class universities in the USA. Not only did he become a pioneer and a leading figure in Borderland Studies, but he is a borderlander in every sense of the word.
Georgian Astrological Texts of the 17th, 18th and 19th Centuries
In Christ Came Forth From India, Timothy Paul Grove offers a survey and contextualiztion of early modern Georgian writings on astrology, astronomy, and cosmology.
These texts include the widely distributed translations of the Almanacco Perpetuo of Ottavio Beltrano (1653), a text brought to the Caucasus by Roman Catholic missionaries, several texts attributed to King Vakht’ang VI of Kartli (1675–1737), and two 19th century manuscripts which incorporate much older material. The numerous Georgian texts are described and examined in terms of their chronology and interrelated content, their literary relationship to texts from outside the Caucasus, and their context within the astrological literature of Europe, the Near East, and the Far East.
Blick ins Buch

This book explores the nexus of media and memory practices in contemporary Slovenia. In the age of mediatised societies, the country’s post-socialist, post-Yugoslav present has become saturated with historical revisionism and various nostalgic framings of the past.
Pušnik and Luthar have collected a wide range of case studies analysing the representation and reinterpretation of past events in newspapers, theatre, music, museums, digital media, and documentaries. The volume thus presents insights into the intricacies of the mediatisation of memory in contemporary Slovenian society.
The authors engage with dynamic uses of media today and provide new analyses of media culture as archive, site of historical reinterpretation, and repository of memory.