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Z. Anthony Kruszewski in Wartime Europe and Postwar America
Author: Beata Halicka
Beata Halicka’s masterly narrated biography is the story of an extraordinary man and leading intellectual in the Polish-American community. Z. Anthony Kruszewski was first a Polish scout fighting in World War II against the Nazi occupiers, then a Prisoner of War/Displaced Person in Western Europe. He was stranded as a penniless immigrant in post-war America and eventually became a world-renowned academic.
Kruszewski’s almost incredible life stands out from his entire generation. His story is a microcosm of 20th-century history, covering various theatres and incorporating key events and individuals. Kruszewski walks a stage very few people have even stood on, both as an eye-witness at the centre of the Second World War, and later as vice-president of the Polish American Congress, and a professor and political scientist at world-class universities in the USA. Not only did he become a pioneer and a leading figure in Borderland Studies, but he is a borderlander in every sense of the word.
A New Foundation for the Study of Parables
The Fables of Jesus in the Gospel of Luke introduces the world of the ancient fable to biblical scholarship and argues that Jesus’s parables in Luke’s gospel belong to the ancient fable tradition.
Jesus is regarded as the first figure in history to use the parable genre with any regularity—a remarkable historical curiosity that serves as the foundation for many assumptions in New Testament scholarship. The Fables of Jesus in the Gospel of Luke challenges this consensus, situating the parables within a literary context unknown to biblical scholarship: the ancient fable. After introducing the ancient fable, the “parables” of Jesus in Luke’s gospel are used as a testing ground to demon - strate that they are identical to first-century fables. This challenges many conven - tional assumptions about parables, Luke’s gospel, and the relationship of Jesus to the storytelling traditions of the Mediterranean world. This study offers multitudes of new parallels to the otherwise enigmatic parable tradition, opens an exciting new venue for comparative exploration, and lays a new foundation upon which to study the fables of Jesus.
Open Access
Romani Literature and Press in Central, South-Eastern and Eastern Europe from the 19th Century until World War II
The book focuses on the early period of Roma publishing (from the nineteenth century until the Second World War) when the first original texts, fiction and media publications authored by Roma appeared.
Based on extensive archival and historical research, including the discovery of earlier, up to now unknown sources, the literary activities of Roma in Central, South-eastern and Eastern Europe are discussed in their historical context and interrelation with the birth of the Roma emancipatory movement. Romani literature and press are thus embedded in the history and literary studies of the European national literatures.
The authors: Raluca Bianca Roman, Sofiya Zahova, Aleksandar G. Marinov, Elena Marushiakova and Vesselin Popov are affiliated with the University of St Andrews, UK. Other authors are Tamás Hajnáczky (Károli Gáspár University of the Reformed Church in Hungary), Viktor Shapoval (Moscow City University, Russia), and Risto Blomster (Finnish Literature Society/ The Finnish Cultural Foundation).
Open Access
The author displays the complex constitutional history of Serbia as a case study, following the evolution of the most important concepts such as human rights and the rule of law.
The first part of the book („Developments“) displays the main events as a chronological narrative, also giving a sketch of the history of Serbian legal institutions. The second part („The Evolution of Constitutionalism“) follows the evolution of two principal constitutional concepts i.e. human rights and the rule of law in Serbia. The third part („Serbia and Yugoslavia“) analyses the specific historical dimensions of Serbian constitutionalism in its relationship with the history of the Balkan peninsula.
A Demographic and Historical Study
This monograph, which complements the existing body of work on the Armenian diaspora in a Central European context, is the first demographic synthesis devoted to the Armenian community in Old Poland and Austrian Galicia (1772–1860). It is the story of the biological and cultural trajectory of a human life: birth, marriage, childbearing, family life, sickness, old age and death. The author enumerates the Armenian diaspora in Austrian Galicia and poses questions regarding Armenian identity, religious practices and community life. The book includes a discussion of archival sources and contains a selection of the parish family registers (status animarum) in the annex. These documents, which not only enhance the narration but also detail the Armenian families, can stimulate further research and support genealogical investigations.
A Specific Enclave in Contemporary Europe
The main objective of the book is a multi-aspect analysis of the functioning of the Kaliningrad Region in contemporary political reality, both in internal and international dimensions.

The area constitutes a unique enclave in contemporary Europe, being the only part of Russia separated from the mother country, which determines the taking place therein in the dimension of relations: bilateral, multilateral (e.g. EU - Russia, NATO - Russia, Baltic Sea Region cooperation) as well as regional and local cooperation. The book is a result of many years’ work of scientists from Poland, Russia and Sweden, who have been researching the functioning of the Kaliningrad Region in internal and external dimensions.

It is a ‘must to read’ volume for all EU-Russia observers and experts.” - Prof. Dr. Piotr Dutkiewicz, Director of the Center for Governance and Public Management, Carleton University, Ottawa, Canada
It is an invaluable guide to analysing and understanding contemporary Russia.” - Prof. Dr. Jaroslav Dvorak, Head of the Department of Public Administration and Political Sciences, Klaipėda University, Klaipėda, Lithuania
Forms of Translation and Recreation
Author: Rebecca Hagen
This book examines the retranslation of Hamlet in Germany in the 20th and the early 21st century.
It adopts a comparative approach, juxtaposing four retranslations (the versions by Hauptmann, Fried, Günther, Schanelec and Gosch) of Shakespeare’s Hamlet to Schlegel’s canonical translation of the Long Nineteenth Century. By comparing and contrasting the succeeding translations to the Schlegelian translation as well as their direct predecessors, it can be assessed to what extent retranslators have engaged with previous solutions, thereby benefitting the creation of a translating tradition. Beyond the linguistic examination of the translations, it is the author’s aim to contribute to a deeper understanding of the process of retranslation as a whole.
Latvians in the West after World War II
Author: Andrejs Plakans
The book is a group biography of the 175,000+ Latvians who fled their homeland during the final year of World War II (1944–45), lived until 1951 as refugees in Sweden and Germany, and then dispersed to other countries throughout the world.
The post-1945 history of these Latvians includes a description of their lives in ‘displaced person’ camps in post-war Germany, dispersion in the 1949–1951 years, resettlement in new host countries in Europe and overseas, strategies of adaptation to the new circumstances, organizational efforts, acculturation and assimilation, measures of cultural and linguistic preservation, renewal of contacts with the old homeland, generational change and disagreements, political mobilization, changes in personal and group identity, and, after 1991, the inclusion by the Latvian government of the descendants of this post-war population into a formally designated ‘Latvian diaspora’ (Diaspora Law, 2019).
Buriat Buddhists in Imperial Russia
The book systematically explores the history of the Buddhist community in the Russian Empire. It offers an advanced overview of the relations that existed between the Buriat Buddhists and the Russian imperial authorities.
Various institutions and actors represented Russian power: foreign and interior ministries, the Irkutsk general-governorship, the Orthodox Christian mission of East Siberia, local journalists and academic scholars. The book is focussing especially on the evolution of imperial legislation and specific administrative mechanisms aiming at the regulation of Buddhist affairs. The author demonstrates how these actors responded to conflicting situations and collisions of interests. Thus the history of relations between Russia and her Buddhist subjects is shown as a complex process with participation of a number of actors with their own interests and motivations.
Judith Butler is regarded as one of the most popular philosophers of the present. Famous for her theory of gender her wide-ranging work explored such themes as language, power, recognition, vulnerability, mourning, and grievability, revolutions, democratic movements, and resistance. This book provides an overview of Butler’s rich scholarship and utilizes selected examples to present opportunities for a theological approach to her work. Of particular interest in this regard are the clear parallels between Butler’s thought and progressive theologies, such as Liberation Theology or the New Political Theology founded by Johann Baptist Metz. With attention to Butlers Jewish background, this unique interdisciplinary investigation bridges Butler’s thought, political philosophy, and Christian theology. Judith Butler and Theology considers how the reflections and insights of this critical intellectual can help set a constructive theology for the challenges of our century.