Browse results

You are looking at 11 - 16 of 16 items for :

  • Slavic and Eurasian Studies x
  • Primary Language: English x
  • Search level: Titles x
  • Status (Books): Not Yet Published x
Clear All
Geographers and Borders in Inter-war Europe
Author: Maciej Górny
Can geographers actually create their fatherlands? The story of the territorial reconstruction of East Central Europe in the wake of WWI gives an affirmative answer.
The protagonists of this book were a cohort of young, talented and exceedingly ambitious people fascinated by the modernity of late 19th century German geographical sciences. During wartime they proved particularly successful in scholarship and in scientifically based national propaganda. Some of them succeeded in influencing the spatial idea of ‘just borders’ that allegedly corresponded best to geographical and ethnical realities. They offered ready-made solutions to questions of the self-determination of nations formulated by US President Wilson. But already during the Paris Peace Conference, geographers moved to concepts of a ‘natural’, ‘biological’ border, to ideas of the subjugation of entire ethnic groups. They now cherished visions of a demographic and geographical utopia of states that were ethnically homogeneous.
Full Access
The Memoirs of ’Abd al-Majid al-Qadiri
Volume Editors: Alfrid Bustanov and Vener Usmanov
The world as seen by a Qur’an specialist in late imperial and early Soviet Russia. Our book tells a dramatic story of ’Abd al-Majid al-Qadiri, a Muslim individual born in the Kazakh lands and brought up in the Sufi environment of the South Urals, who memorized the entire Qur’an at the Mosque of the Prophet. In Russia he travelled widely, performing the Qur'an recitations. The Stalinist terror was merciless to him: in total, he spent fifteen years of his life in labour camps in Solovki, in the North, and Tashkent, in the south. At the end of his life, al-Qadiri wrote the fascinating memoirs that we analysed and translated in this book for the first time. Al-Qadiri’s life account allows us to look at the history of Islam in Russia from a new angle. His lively language provides access to everyday concerns of Russia’s Muslims, their personal interactions, their emotions, and the material world that surrounded them. Al-Qadiri’s book is a book of memory, full of personal drama and hope.
Open Access
Volume Editor: Gábor Kármán
This collection of essays presents various aspects of a group of participants in the Thirty Years War which hitherto received only cursory attention in international research context: the princes of Transylvania. Experts of the specific fields present up-to-date summaries as well as fresh results on questions of military history, diplomatic contacts, war finances, media history and discourses in political communication related to the activities of Gábor Bethlen and György Rákóczi I. Special attention is dedicated to the peculiar characteristic of the Transylvanian involvement in the great European conflict – the Ottoman threat, which derived from the fact that the principality was one of the sultan’s Christian tributaries.
Full Access
Art, Material Culture, and British-Russian Relations
Volume Editor: Louise Hardiman
“Courtly Gifts and Cultural Diplomacy” explores the history of British-Russian state relations from the perspective of art and material culture. This richly illustrated book presents manifold practices of courtly gift-giving and vivid case studies of British-Russian artistic diplomacy over the centuries. It traces a visual and material history of cross-cultural dialogue that starts with an early English map of Russia made in the 16th century and ends with gifts of Fabergé art objects and domestic photographs exchanged between the British royal family and the family of Tsar Nicholas II in late Imperial Russia. Twelve expert authors from academia, the arts, and the museum sectors in Britain, Russia, and the United States present new narratives and critical interpretations based on material from previously unexplored archives. Their diverse approaches reveal the importance of artistic diplomacy and the agency of gifts of art and material culture in courtly and state relations.
Full Access
Volume Editors: Kirsten John-Stucke and Daniela Siepe
Wewelsburg Castle in Germany figures prominently in right-wing conspiracy theories and popular culture. This book sheds light onto the background and impact of these myths for the first time.
During the Nazi era, this Westphalian castle became a key venue for gatherings of high ranking SS leaders. After World War II, rumors about occult SS rituals made the place a pilgrimage site of the extreme right. The northern tower’s ornamental sun wheel design, today known as the “Black Sun,” appears in thrillers, comic books, and in the right-wing music scene. It has morphed into a dubious visual element of today’s pop culture and is now familiar to people throughout the world as a symbol of neofascist and alt-right groups. The lavishly illustrated volume traces facts and fiction about the origins and current reception of the myths related to Wewelsburg Castle and the sun wheel symbol.
Full Access
The Polish-Ukrainian Conflict 1943–1947
Series:  FOKUS, Volume: 6
Author: Grzegorz Motyka
This is the first book available in English to comprehensively address the complicated subject of Polish-Ukrainian relations during and immediately after World War II. Polish-Ukrainian relations in the twentieth century are a topic that invariably engages historians, politicians, and public opinion in Poland and Ukraine. Many valuable works have been written on the subject, but many are distorting historical truth and collective memories, sometimes making today’s mutual relations problematic. Grzegorz Motyka’s book is a careful account of the most difficult period in Polish-Ukrainian relations, beginning in 1943 with the start of the Volhynian massacre and ending with the “Vistula” action in 1947. By discussing episodes of common history in an accessible manner, Professor Motyka presents an impartial picture of Polish-Ukrainian relations, devoid of national martyrology. In extremely difficult times, it builds a bridge for mutual understanding across historical divides.
Full Access