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The battle over the possessions of Prince Albert of Thurn and Taxis in interwar Yugoslavia
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When Yugoslavia was created in 1918, noble landowners still possessed vast parts of its territory especially in the northwestern half of the country which had formerly belonged to the Habsburg Monarchy. With approximately 38,000 hectares, Prince Albert of Thurn and Taxis was the largest private owner of forests in the new kingdom. Yugoslav politicians demanded an expropriation, justifying their actions on the grounds of social and historical justice. At the same time, political and business networks attempted to appropriate the property themselves. The parties involved - Thurn and Taxis, Yugoslav officials, national and international companies - fought for their interests using various means, from lawsuits to international arbitrage and political lobbyism. This book concentrates on the latter, arriving at a “grammar of bribery” in the lumber business of interwar Yugoslavia.
The publication of this outstanding book marks the beginning of the Brill book series Roma History and Culture. The core of the present volume is an until now unpublished manuscript by Shakir Pashov (1898-1981), a Bulgarian Roma activist whose name continues to be surrounded by rumours and myths. The volume includes the original manuscript of Shakir Pashov on the history of the Gypsies in Europe, followed by archival documents highlighting his life and work, and the text of the first booklet devoted to him, which was the first attempt to create a Roma historical narrative. There is also included an extended biography of Shakir Pashov as known by now. The book contributes to identifying and highlighting the numerous inputs Roma have had to shape their activism and popularise their historical knowledge. Pashov's manuscript is a prominent example of these efforts.
Open Access
The heightened role of religion in the public sphere can become either a source of violence or a source of reconciliation. Considering Indonesia as a pluralistic state in terms of religion despite the fact that Indonesia has the largest Muslim population in the world, a basic question arises: Would it be possible for religion to play a pivotal role in the public sphere of Indonesian society without seeking hegemonic control of social, political, and intellectual life? This book offers positive suggestions of how religion can develop as a transformative and liberating force in Indonesian public affairs. Based on Calvin’s and Neo-Calvinist Legal Theory, this book suggests that it is only within the realm of civil society that Indonesian religion will be able to promote the ideas of democracy, tolerance, and human rights in Indonesian public affairs. In short, far from being anti-pluralist, Indonesian religion evolves as a liberating force in the life of society, nation, and state.
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The figure of the “professional” looms large in our contemporary society as an ideal for economic activity and socio-political inclusion, and even as a model for individual self-development. But how and when did this figure arise? And what has led professional activity to become such an essential part of our personal, social, moral, economic, and political life? While Max Weber and others have famously addressed these questions, this book reveals a more nuanced history of the concept of “profession” and “professional duty,” and offers the first comprehensive study of the discourse of professional ethics from a historical perspective. Italy, France, Germany, and the United Kingdom provide most of the rich corpus of philosophical, juridical, and theological sources discussed throughout the book in its longue durée journey from Ancient Rome to the present.
Unlocking the Golden Past of the Rudari Woodworkers
This is the first monograph on the history of the Rudari people of Romania and the first mapping of their settlements. The Rudari are a population which has traditionally inhabited the Balkan area and much of Central Europe. Many of them do not know the Romani language but speak Romanian dialects and today make a living out of carving wooden household items, although their Slavic name alludes to mining. Indeed, the Rudari were for centuries gold-prospectors and gold-washers working for the Crown of Wallachia and were administrated as slaves by a monastery situated on the auriferous Olt river. The authors have reconstructed the fascinating history of this ethnic group for a period of 500 years until the 19th century when gold-panning went in decline due to the exhaustion of the reserves of alluvial gold.
Open Access
Series:  FOKUS, Volume: 11
This volume offers original research focusing on the history of prostitution in Europe, and specifically, Central and East-Central Europe. While most existing literature on the topic comes in the form of monographs focusing on a specific country, this edited collection has a broader geographical scope. The papers approach the subject of prostitution from a broad range of perspectives and therefore offer an overview of the multiple sources and methodological approaches in the field of the history of prostitution. The edited collection contains three articles on prostitution in socialist countries in Eastern Europe. These articles are among the first to explore prostitution under socialism.
Eastern and Western Sociocultural Perspectives
Series:  FOKUS, Volume: 10
Volume Editor:
The essays cover a broad scope of issues relating to individual identity strategies and art collecting in the late modern era, encompassing the history of museums, exhibition policy, art market history, history of taste shaping and provenance research. They create a comparative pan-European perspective of the collecting phenomenon in its various facets. The detailed analysis of the individual cases shows how collecting mirrored the social problems of the late modern era. The book adresses issues such as the socio-cultural role of ethnic minorities, the question of women's emancipation, social exclusion versus inclusion, colonialism or the politicisation of museums. When analysed in the context of private collections, these issues gain clarity and simultaneously demonstrate the complexity of cultural processes, which are still not sufficiently recognised.
Volume Editor:
This collection of essays presents various aspects of a group of participants in the Thirty Years War which hitherto received only cursory attention in international research context: the princes of Transylvania. Experts of the specific fields present up-to-date summaries as well as fresh results on questions of military history, diplomatic contacts, war finances, media history and discourses in political communication related to the activities of Gábor Bethlen and György Rákóczi I. Special attention is dedicated to the peculiar characteristic of the Transylvanian involvement in the great European conflict – the Ottoman threat, which derived from the fact that the principality was one of the sultan’s Christian tributaries.
Geographers and Borders in Inter-war Europe
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Can geographers actually create their fatherlands? The story of the territorial reconstruction of East Central Europe in the wake of WWI gives an affirmative answer.
The protagonists of this book were a cohort of young, talented and exceedingly ambitious people fascinated by the modernity of late 19th century German geographical sciences. During wartime they proved particularly successful in scholarship and in scientifically based national propaganda. Some of them succeeded in influencing the spatial idea of ‘just borders’ that allegedly corresponded best to geographical and ethnical realities. They offered ready-made solutions to questions of the self-determination of nations formulated by US President Wilson. But already during the Paris Peace Conference, geographers moved to concepts of a ‘natural’, ‘biological’ border, to ideas of the subjugation of entire ethnic groups. They now cherished visions of a demographic and geographical utopia of states that were ethnically homogeneous.
Volume Editors: and
Wewelsburg Castle in Germany figures prominently in right-wing conspiracy theories and popular culture. This book sheds light onto the background and impact of these myths for the first time.
During the Nazi era, this Westphalian castle became a key venue for gatherings of high ranking SS leaders. After World War II, rumors about occult SS rituals made the place a pilgrimage site of the extreme right. The northern tower’s ornamental sun wheel design, today known as the “Black Sun,” appears in thrillers, comic books, and in the right-wing music scene. It has morphed into a dubious visual element of today’s pop culture and is now familiar to people throughout the world as a symbol of neofascist and alt-right groups. The lavishly illustrated volume traces facts and fiction about the origins and current reception of the myths related to Wewelsburg Castle and the sun wheel symbol.