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This volume takes us back to the roots of Christianity and exemplifies the significance of Syriac Theology for our time.
Bringing together articles by scholars from diverse disciplines, this volume aims at a deeper understanding of the legacy, importance, and challenges of Syriac Theology. The articles in the first part of the volume focus on the biblical, exegetical, and christological tradition of the Syriac Orthodox Church. The articles in the second part of the volume explore the dialogical intertextuality between Syriac Christianity, Rabbinic Judaism, and the Quran.
Status, Mobility, and Social Transformation in Southeastern Europe, 1700–1850
This is a book about people caught between home and abroad, crossing imperial boundaries in southeastern Europe at the beginning of the modern age.
Through a series of life stories, which the author reconstructs with the aid of many new sources, readers discover how certain men and women defined and adapted their loyalties and affiliations, how they fashioned their identities, how they enrolled their linguistic, political, economic, and social resources to build a family and a career. Travelling between Istanbul, Vienna, Trieste, Moscow, Bucharest, or Iaşi, individuals of different backgrounds built their networks across borders, linking people and objects and facilitating cultural transfer and material and social change.
Open Access
Johanna, Marie und Marguerite von Bismarck als adelige Akteurinnen 1824–1945
Author: Andrea Hopp
Ehefrau, Tochter und Schwiegertochter: Erstmals rücken die drei Otto von Bismarck am nächsten stehenden weiblichen Familienangehörigen gemeinsam in den Fokus der historischen Forschung.
Andrea Hopp betrachtet Johanna, Marie und Marguerite von Bismarck als adelige Akteurinnen aus drei Generationen und wirft ein Licht auf bislang unbeachtete Machtstrukturen in der Familie. So unterschiedlich die drei mit den ihnen zugedachten Rollen umgingen, so einig waren sie sich in ihrem elitären Selbstverständnis, das sie mit ihrem Ehemann, Vater und Schwiegervater teilten. Die Verteidigung hergebrachter adeliger Vorrechte gegen die modernen bürgerlich-liberalen Kräfte erachteten sie daher als zentrale Aufgabe. Insbesondere als emotionale Bezugspersonen wirkten sie sowohl auf den Politiker als auch auf die nachfolgenden Familiengenerationen ein. Nicht zu unterschätzen ist daher auch ihr Einfluss auf die Bewahrung des politischen Vermächtnisses des ersten deutschen Reichskanzlers.
Roma Civic Emancipation Elite in Central, South Eastern, and Eastern Europe, 1800-1940
Volume Editors: Elena Marushiakova and Vesselin Popov
The book presents the life, visions and activities of the nascent Roma civic elite who initiated the movement for Roma civic emancipation.
The book Roma Portraits in History, in the form of individual portraits, presents the life trajectory, visions and specific actions put forward by the nascent Roma elite and its leading representatives concerning the present and future of their community. The book is based on a rich source base of key original archival documents, in multiple languages, including Romani language, discovered in countries across the region of Central, Eastern and South-Eastern Europe, all of which showcase ‘Roma elite’ visions and action. To fulfil the general picture case studies of representatives from Spain and the US are also included.
Open Access
Festschrift for Patriarch Daniel of the Romanian Orthodox Church
In this anniversary volume, outstanding personalities of the Church and the international theological field will present significant studies as a sign of appreciation for the spiritual, theological, missionary, and pastoral work carried out by the Patriarch Daniel of Romania.
In 2021, His Beatitude Patriarch Daniel of Romania celebrates his 70th anniversary. A prominent personality, a tireless servant of Christ’s Church, Professor of Dogmatic and Pastoral Theology, His Beatitude Daniel is well known for his deep and open theology, one that has been consistently pursuing dialogue and communion. His vast theological work deals with most of the fundamental aspects of theology and is built upon the living connection between theology, spirituality, the liturgical and missionary life of the Church.
Envisioning Scriptural Interpretation as a Symbolic Act with Origen of Alexandria
Author: Kyeil Kwak
Origen envisioned scriptural interpretation as a symbolic drama of passage with the Logos-Christ, reuniting what is originally one.
During the first three centuries C.E., σύμβολον (symbol) became a prominent term along with αἴνιγμα (enigma) and ἀλληγορία (allegory) in forming a cosmic formula popular across the Mediterrnean world: symbol encodes the divine mystery in enigmatic forms and allegory decodes them. Having considered Scripture as full of divine symbols, Origen envisioned and practiced allegorical interpretation of Scritpure as a symbolic act of bringing, comparing, and matching its letters under the divine paideia of the Logos-Christ. In seeking three levels of scriptural meaning, Origen construed the cosmos as a tripartite reality and defined the essence of Christianity as a symbolic drama of passage. For Origen, the main actor of this drama is the Logos-Christ in the divine action of gradually leading his bride (i.e., the church) from the visible reality through the invisible reality to the divine reality.
Aramaic, Hebrew, and Greek
Author: Anthony Meyer
This study brings together all ancient evidence to tell the story of the divine name, YHWH, as it travels in Aramaic, Hebrew, and Greek through the Second Temple period, the most formative era of Judaism.
During the Second Temple period (516 BCE–70 CE), Jews became reticent to speak and write the divine name, YHWH, also known by its four letters in Greek as the tetragrammaton. Priestly, pious, and scribal circles limitted the use of God’s name, and then it disappeared. The variables are poorly understood and the evidence is scattered. This study brings together all ancient Jewish literary and epigraphic evidence in Aramaic, Hebrew, and Greek to describe how, when, and in what sources Jews either used or avoided the divine name. Instead of a diachronic contrast from use to avoidance, as is often the scholarly assumption, the evidence suggests diverse and overlapping naming practices that draw specific meaning from linguistic, geographic, and social contexts.
Volume Editors: Kirsten John-Stucke and Daniela Siepe
Wewelsburg Castle in Germany figures prominently in right-wing conspiracy theories and popular culture. This book sheds light onto the background and impact of these myths for the first time.
During the Nazi era, this Westphalian castle became a key venue for gatherings of high ranking SS leaders. After World War II, rumors about occult SS rituals made the place a pilgrimage site of the extreme right. The northern tower’s ornamental sun wheel design, today known as the “Black Sun,” appears in thrillers, comic books, and in the right-wing music scene. It has morphed into a dubious visual element of today’s pop culture and is now familiar to people throughout the world as a symbol of neofascist and alt-right groups. The lavishly illustrated volume traces facts and fiction about the origins and current reception of the myths related to Wewelsburg Castle and the sun wheel symbol.
A Search Towards a New Way of Understanding the Filipino Consciousness of God
Author: Kenneth Centeno
This philosophical exploration navigates the slippery terrains of the Sacred between Secularism and Fundamentalism.
Renegotiating the Sacred attempts to map out the landscape of religious consciousness of the Filipinos in contemporary time by critically rereading both the Western and local thinkers who grappled with this theme. By contesting the predominance of the binary ‘profane-sacred’ as lens of interpretation, especially when it comes to philosophy of religion, this multi-disciplinary research tries to unravel the knots and knurls of the sacred and its entanglement into the dizzying web of socio-cultural structures, political tensions, economic marginalization, and philosophical-theological questions.
These essays examine the relation between “philosophy,” an enterprise construed in various ways by Christian theologians, and the exegetical works of Greek and Byzantine interpreters. Though scholars often recognize the significance of philosophical traditions both for allegorical interpretation and for commentaries, they have paid less attention to the role of moral philosophy, for instance, in patristic moral exhortation. These essays explore wide a variety of ways philosophical traditions intersect with Eastern patristic exegesis.