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Diese Studie beschäftigt sich mit der zentralen Reflektionsfigur des Fiktionalen in Henry V, der „mockery“.
Diese Arbeit untersucht die zentrale Reflektionsfigur des Fiktionalen in Shakespeares Henry V, nämlich die „mockery“, die sowohl Imitation als auch Verspottung umfasst. Das Verhältnis von „mockery“ und „true things“ im Stück konstruiert eine immanente Poetik des Historiendramas, das damit gleichsam die Relation von Fiktion und Wahrheit, nicht nur im Sinne der Historizität, sondern auch des Universellen, reflektiert. Untersucht werden Aspekte der Kommunikation und Übersetzung, die Rolle des Publikums, der Umgang mit Möglichkeit und Notwendigkeit sowie die Kontextualisierung in den frühneuzeitlichen Diskurs zu Dichtkunst.
Ambiguities of Self-Annotation in Pope and Byron
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What literary and social functions do self-annotations (i.e. footnotes and endnotes that authors appended to their own works) serve?
Focussing on Alexander Pope’s Dunciads and a wide selection of Lord Byron’s poems, Lahrsow shows that literary self-annotations rarely just explain a text. Rather, they multiply meanings and pit different voices against each other. Self-annotations serve to ambiguate the author’s self-presentation as well as the genre, tone, and overall interpretation of a text.
The study also examines how notes were employed for ‘social networking’ and how authors used self-annotations to address, and differentiate between, various groups of readerships.
Additionally, the volume sheds light on the wider literary and cultural context of self-annotations: How common were they during the long eighteenth century? What conventions governed them? And were they even read? The study hence combines literary analysis with insights into book history and the history of reading.
Open Access
The Violent Consequences of Ideological Warfare in the 20th Century
From a global perspective, the historical relationship between war and communism throughout the 20th century is discussed in this book.
Communist theory was supposed to lead to a classless society that would thereby overcome nationalism, imperialism, violence, and eventually war itself. Regardless of the theoretical assumption that a communist utopia would end wars forever, communism very often related to war, not only in a theoretical sense, but also in the actual historical process. How communist theorists interpreted war, argued for or against it and tried to sanction the use of violence in the name of a communist utopia are questions for this anthology about an “unnatural interrelationship”. At the same time, the contributions of this volume take a closer look at violent responses against communism during the 20th century.
The book presents the annotated texts of 21 songs of Eastern Mongol shamans. The transcriptions are kept in the Archives of Oral Literature of the Northrhine-Westphalian Academy of Sciences and Arts in Düsseldorf.
The publication contributes new knowledge of the history, ritual practices, beliefs and customs of the Qorčin (Khorchin) Mongol shamans of eastern Inner Mongolia in particular. It focuses on 21 shamanic songs performed for different purposes. They are sung by 8 shamans who were born in the first decades of the 20th century. The Mongol texts of the songs are supplied with an English translation, extensive commentaries, and melodies in numeric notation. The author analyses the 21 songs by making use of passages from songs belonging to the repertoire of other Qorčin Mongol shamans. The 21 songs were placed within a broad framework of Mongolian oral legends and heroic epics, showing that they also evoke themes recurring in different contexts. The book contains 18 photos taken by the author during field trips among the Qorčin shamans.
The Pedagogical Preparation for Collective Mass Violence
This book shows that education does not only prepare war, but defines its character for future generations.
Pointing out the intricate interconnetion with the various practices of education this volume offers in-depth studies of war and education in several chronological and geographical contexts. Tying in with the latest state of the art the authors offer examples for education for war, education in war and education for reconciliation in the aftermath of wars from a global perspective.
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Medicine, ethics, and theology embrace various ideas and concepts regarding human suffering – ranging from pain, suffering from loneliness, a lack of meaning or finitude, to a religious understanding of suffering, grounded in a suffering and compassionate God.
In the practices of clinical medical ethics and health care chaplaincy, these diverse concepts overlap. What kind of conflicts arise from different concepts in patient care and counseling, and how should they be dealt with in a reflective way? Fostering international interdisciplinary scientific conversations, the book aims to deepen the discussion in medical ethics concerning the understanding of suffering, and the caring and counseling of patients.
Judith Butler is regarded as one of the most popular philosophers of the present. Famous for her theory of gender her wide-ranging work explored such themes as language, power, recognition, vulnerability, mourning, and grievability, revolutions, democratic movements, and resistance. This book provides an overview of Butler’s rich scholarship and utilizes selected examples to present opportunities for a theological approach to her work. Of particular interest in this regard are the clear parallels between Butler’s thought and progressive theologies, such as Liberation Theology or the New Political Theology founded by Johann Baptist Metz. With attention to Butlers Jewish background, this unique interdisciplinary investigation bridges Butler’s thought, political philosophy, and Christian theology. Judith Butler and Theology considers how the reflections and insights of this critical intellectual can help set a constructive theology for the challenges of our century.
A Commentary on De ciuitate Dei 10
This theological and philological commentary provides a detailed description of Augustine’s argument and reveals the areas where Augustine misrepresents or oversimplifies Porphyry’s thought in the Deregressu animae and other works.
This work establishes a new foundation for any future work on Porphyry’s Deregressu animae. Via comparison with Porphyry’s extant Greek works and fragments, the commentary sheds light on seven key topics in Augustine’s presentation:
1) the ‘spiritual soul,’
2) the nature of theurgy,
3) the report that Porphyry attributes passsiones to the gods,
4) the coherence of the De regressu animae with Porphyry’s other works, in particular his De philosophia ex oraculis and Epistula ad Anebontem,
5) the report on the purifying principia,
6) Porphyry’s views on reincarnation, and
7) the universal way of salvation.
A rare scholarly attempt to focus on the last decade of Augustine’s life, this volume highlights the themes and concerns that occupied the aged bishop of Hippo and led him to formulate some of his central notions in the most radical fashion. Augustine of Hippo’s last decade from 420 to 430 witnessed the completion of some of his most infl uential works, from the City of God to the Unfi nished Work against Julian of Eclanum, from On the Trinity to the Literal Commentary on Genesis. During this period Augustine remained fully engaged as bishop and administrator, but also began to curate his legacy, revising his previous works and pushing many of his earlier ideas to novel and at times radical conclusions. Yet, this last period of Augustine’s life has received only modest scholarly attention. With a cast of international scholars, the present volume opens a conversation and makes the case that the late (wild) Augustine deserves at least as much attention as the Augustine of the Confessions.
Education, Crisis, Diachronicity and the Transition to a Sustainable Future
This work contributes to education for sustainability with innovative pedagogy and a new conceptual approach. It is based on a realistic assessment of our future in the Anthropocene, based on principles of human security and scientific models of remaining safe operating space. It critiques current approaches to education for sustainability and highlights solutions. A chapter on the ethics of sustainability education provides the conceptual basis for a taxonomy of learning outcomes and a section on how culturally diverse communities of learners can transform their guiding values in today’s classrooms.
Special attention is given to cultural learning, developing shared visions and diverse approaches, collective learning from transition events such as the 2020 pandemic, cultures learning from each other, and teacher education. The book integrates environmental ethics, zero growth and climate mitigation into a blueprint to educate successfully for a Great Transition to a truly sustainable future for a smaller, wiser humanity.