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This collection of essays presents various aspects of a group of participants in the Thirty Years War which hitherto received only cursory attention in international research context: the princes of Transylvania. Experts of the specific fields present up-to-date summaries as well as fresh results on questions of military history, diplomatic contacts, war finances, media history and discourses in political communication related to the activities of Gábor Bethlen and György Rákóczi I. Special attention is dedicated to the peculiar characteristic of the Transylvanian involvement in the great European conflict – the Ottoman threat, which derived from the fact that the principality was one of the sultan’s Christian tributaries.
Geographers and Borders in Inter-war Europe
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Can geographers actually create their fatherlands? The story of the territorial reconstruction of East Central Europe in the wake of WWI gives an affirmative answer.
The protagonists of this book were a cohort of young, talented and exceedingly ambitious people fascinated by the modernity of late 19th century German geographical sciences. During wartime they proved particularly successful in scholarship and in scientifically based national propaganda. Some of them succeeded in influencing the spatial idea of ‘just borders’ that allegedly corresponded best to geographical and ethnical realities. They offered ready-made solutions to questions of the self-determination of nations formulated by US President Wilson. But already during the Paris Peace Conference, geographers moved to concepts of a ‘natural’, ‘biological’ border, to ideas of the subjugation of entire ethnic groups. They now cherished visions of a demographic and geographical utopia of states that were ethnically homogeneous.
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Wewelsburg Castle in Germany figures prominently in right-wing conspiracy theories and popular culture. This book sheds light onto the background and impact of these myths for the first time.
During the Nazi era, this Westphalian castle became a key venue for gatherings of high ranking SS leaders. After World War II, rumors about occult SS rituals made the place a pilgrimage site of the extreme right. The northern tower’s ornamental sun wheel design, today known as the “Black Sun,” appears in thrillers, comic books, and in the right-wing music scene. It has morphed into a dubious visual element of today’s pop culture and is now familiar to people throughout the world as a symbol of neofascist and alt-right groups. The lavishly illustrated volume traces facts and fiction about the origins and current reception of the myths related to Wewelsburg Castle and the sun wheel symbol.
The Violent Consequences of Ideological Warfare in the 20th Century
From a global perspective, the historical relationship between war and communism throughout the 20th century is discussed in this book.
Communist theory was supposed to lead to a classless society that would thereby overcome nationalism, imperialism, violence, and eventually war itself. Regardless of the theoretical assumption that a communist utopia would end wars forever, communism very often related to war, not only in a theoretical sense, but also in the actual historical process. How communist theorists interpreted war, argued for or against it and tried to sanction the use of violence in the name of a communist utopia are questions for this anthology about an “unnatural interrelationship”. At the same time, the contributions of this volume take a closer look at violent responses against communism during the 20th century.
The Pedagogical Preparation for Collective Mass Violence
This book shows that education does not only prepare war, but defines its character for future generations.
Pointing out the intricate interconnetion with the various practices of education this volume offers in-depth studies of war and education in several chronological and geographical contexts. Tying in with the latest state of the art the authors offer examples for education for war, education in war and education for reconciliation in the aftermath of wars from a global perspective.
Philosophy is an enterprise that was construed in various ways by early Christian theologians. These essays examine the relation between philosophy, the New Testament and the exegetical works of patristic interpreters. Though scholars often recognize the significance of philosophical traditions for allegorical interpretation, they have paid less attention to early Christianity as a kind of ancient philosophy, i.e., a philosophical way of life and art of exegesis. This volume scrutinizes in new depth how early Christian authors integrated philosophical concepts and practices into their interpretation.
National Minorities in Lithuania and Finland 1918–1939
The book provides a comprehensive picture of the Finnish and Lithuanian minority policies between the World Wars.
The work also offers an opportunity to compare Finland and Lithuania as well as individual minority groups in this respect. Both countries opted for a policy that was quite tolerant by the standards of the time, but not all minorities were treated in the same way. It is evident that changes in political governance also affected the relationship between the majority (titular) population and national minorities.
International Cooperation in Exile within the Assembly of Captive European Nations, 1954–1972
The book expands the history of the Cold War to Eastern European emigrants and their networks.
The “Assembly of Captive European Nations” was a major organisation for Eastern European emigrants in the US since 1954. The cooperation of exiled politicians from nine countries opened up for them new opportunities for lobbying and publications. This book focuses on Estonian contributions to the ACEN. Besides successes, the book reveals troublesome relations with the American authorities, schisms among Europeans and extended national disputes. The ACEN was quickly forgotten after its dissolution in 1972. Based on extensive archival research, this book reflects the ACEN’s aspirations and personalities.
A Demographic and Historical Study
This monograph, which complements the existing body of work on the Armenian diaspora in a Central European context, is the first demographic synthesis devoted to the Armenian community in Old Poland and Austrian Galicia (1772–1860). It is the story of the biological and cultural trajectory of a human life: birth, marriage, childbearing, family life, sickness, old age and death. The author enumerates the Armenian diaspora in Austrian Galicia and poses questions regarding Armenian identity, religious practices and community life. The book includes a discussion of archival sources and contains a selection of the parish family registers (status animarum) in the annex. These documents, which not only enhance the narration but also detail the Armenian families, can stimulate further research and support genealogical investigations.
A Specific Enclave in Contemporary Europe
The main objective of the book is a multi-aspect analysis of the functioning of the Kaliningrad Region in contemporary political reality, both in internal and international dimensions.

The area constitutes a unique enclave in contemporary Europe, being the only part of Russia separated from the mother country, which determines the taking place therein in the dimension of relations: bilateral, multilateral (e.g. EU - Russia, NATO - Russia, Baltic Sea Region cooperation) as well as regional and local cooperation. The book is a result of many years’ work of scientists from Poland, Russia and Sweden, who have been researching the functioning of the Kaliningrad Region in internal and external dimensions.

It is a ‘must to read’ volume for all EU-Russia observers and experts.” - Prof. Dr. Piotr Dutkiewicz, Director of the Center for Governance and Public Management, Carleton University, Ottawa, Canada
It is an invaluable guide to analysing and understanding contemporary Russia.” - Prof. Dr. Jaroslav Dvorak, Head of the Department of Public Administration and Political Sciences, Klaipėda University, Klaipėda, Lithuania