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Challenges for Muslim and Christian Theology
The first book with a focus on free will theism with Christian and Muslim contributions on Divine Action.
Muslims and Christians both believe in a personal God who cares for humans and is present in the life of religious believers. They address God in their petitionary prayers, give thanks to God for God’s mercy and they long for God’s justice. But is it still possible to give thanks to God for our lives if so many others around us seem to suffer without just cause? How can we rely on the power of intercession and divine involvement, if so many other urgent pleas to God appear to go unanswered? This book formulates Muslim and Christian responses to these questions from important contemporary scholars from both traditions – as Ebrahim Moosa, Muhammad Legenhausen, Juliane Hammer, Gregory Boyd and both editors of the book.
These essays examine the relation between “philosophy,” an enterprise construed in various ways by Christian theologians, and the exegetical works of Greek and Byzantine interpreters. Though scholars often recognize the significance of philosophical traditions both for allegorical interpretation and for commentaries, they have paid less attention to the role of moral philosophy, for instance, in patristic moral exhortation. These essays explore wide a variety of ways philosophical traditions intersect with Eastern patristic exegesis.
Editor: Kurt Appel
This volume shows that the vulnerability and mortality of life are the starting points of its transcendence which exceeds all representability.
Only by renouncing fantasies of omnipotence of a theological, philosophical and scientific nature, human beings can advance to their destiny and introduce a New Humanism enabling a bond between all that is alive and between human beings and their transcendent dimension. This includes an understanding of time that no longer follows chronological-mechanistic constraints, a non-instrumental understanding of language that finds its dimension of depth in prayer and an understanding of God in which God is inseparably related to the openness of human existence. In traversing the arising avenues of thought, the four-part volume, written by three authors but to be read as a unity, is oriented towards a philosophy of central biblical passages, Hegel‘s The Phenomenology of Spirit, Musil‘s Man Without Qualities, Hölderlin‘s poetry and Lacan´s psychoanalysis.
Open Access
Aramaic, Hebrew, and Greek
Author: Anthony Meyer
This study brings together all ancient evidence to tell the story of the divine name, YHWH, as it travels in Aramaic, Hebrew, and Greek through the Second Temple period, the most formative era of Judaism.
During the Second Temple period (516 BCE–70 CE), Jews became reticent to speak and write the divine name, YHWH, also known by its four letters in Greek as the tetragrammaton. Priestly, pious, and scribal circles limitted the use of God’s name, and then it disappeared. The variables are poorly understood and the evidence is scattered. This study brings together all ancient Jewish literary and epigraphic evidence in Aramaic, Hebrew, and Greek to describe how, when, and in what sources Jews either used or avoided the divine name. Instead of a diachronic contrast from use to avoidance, as is often the scholarly assumption, the evidence suggests diverse and overlapping naming practices that draw specific meaning from linguistic, geographic, and social contexts.
Editor: Christof Mandry
Medicine, ethics, and theology embrace various ideas and concepts regarding human suffering – ranging from pain, suffering from loneliness, a lack of meaning or finitude, to a religious understanding of suffering, grounded in a suffering and compassionate God.

In the practices of clinical medical ethics and health care chaplaincy, these diverse concepts overlap. What kind of conflicts arise from different concepts in patient care and counseling, and how should they be dealt with in a reflective way? Fostering international interdisciplinary scientific conversations, the book aims to deepen the discussion in medical ethics concerning the understanding of suffering, and the caring and counseling of patients.
Biblical Pneumatology in its Religious-Historical Context
Reinhard Feldmeier interprets biblical statements on the Spirit of God in the context of ancient religious and intellectual history, thereby revealing its fundamental significance for early Christianity and the ensuing need to “test the spirits”. By holding the critical mirror of biblical testimonies up to the Spirit-forgetfulness of churches in the northern hemisphere and to the overemphasis of some churches in the Global South, his intention is to stimulate further theological reflection.
The Holy Spirit is often granted only a minor role in many churches and theologies. Yet in the Global South, where Christianity – in contrast to Europe and North America – is constantly expanding, the Spirit plays the lead role in Pentecostal and Neo-Pentecostal denominations, as well as in charismatic renewal movements of the mainline churches. This study by Reinhard Feldmeier engages that tension in the form of a biblical exegesis which interprets the biblical witnesses in the context of the religious and intellectual history of Graeco-Roman Antiquity. Against this background, Feldmeier demonstrates both the fundamental significance of the Holy Spirit in early Christianity and the necessity of “testing the spirits” which it entails. In this way, the author seeks to hold up the critical mirror of the biblical testimonies to the Spirit-forgetfulness of churches in the northern hemisphere and to the overemphasis of some churches in the Global South and thus to provide both with impulses for further theological reflection.
Judith Butler is regarded as one of the most popular philosophers of the present. Famous for her theory of gender her wide-ranging work explored such themes as language, power, recognition, vulnerability, mourning, and grievability, revolutions, democratic movements, and resistance. This book provides an overview of Butler’s rich scholarship and utilizes selected examples to present opportunities for a theological approach to her work. Of particular interest in this regard are the clear parallels between Butler’s thought and progressive theologies, such as Liberation Theology or the New Political Theology founded by Johann Baptist Metz. With attention to Butlers Jewish background, this unique interdisciplinary investigation bridges Butler’s thought, political philosophy, and Christian theology. Judith Butler and Theology considers how the reflections and insights of this critical intellectual can help set a constructive theology for the challenges of our century.
A rare scholarly attempt to focus on the last decade of Augustine’s life, this volume highlights the themes and concerns that occupied the aged bishop of Hippo and led him to formulate some of his central notions in the most radical fashion. Augustine of Hippo’s last decade from 420 to 430 witnessed the completion of some of his most infl uential works, from the City of God to the Unfi nished Work against Julian of Eclanum, from On the Trinity to the Literal Commentary on Genesis. During this period Augustine remained fully engaged as bishop and administrator, but also began to curate his legacy, revising his previous works and pushing many of his earlier ideas to novel and at times radical conclusions. Yet, this last period of Augustine’s life has received only modest scholarly attention. With a cast of international scholars, the present volume opens a conversation and makes the case that the late (wild) Augustine deserves at least as much attention as the Augustine of the Confessions.
In: Judith Butler and Theology
In: Judith Butler and Theology