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Confessionalization · Enlightenment · Pluralization
Author: Andreas Holzem
Christianity did not reach the modern age by straight paths, but by crooked ones: For two centuries after the Reformation, Catholics and Protestants fought over the truth of their religion. They waged merciless wars and concluded fragile peace treaties. They invested in education and culture. They professionalized clerics and civil servants and tried harder than ever to shape the everyday lives of ordinary people in the villages and towns. They persecuted witches and learned to control the fear of magic.
The Enlightenment, the French Revolution and the Napoleonic Wars created completely new conditions for making Christianity plausible for the modern age.
The book describes the enormous efforts under which Catholic and Protestant men and women faced the upheavals between the Reformation and the Revolution. Many of these efforts were similar. And yet ‘religious knowledge’ developed significantly apart.
This series welcomes multidisciplinary research on the history of ancient and medieval anthropology broadly understood in terms of both its European heritage and its reception of, and engagement with, various cultural and intellectual traditions (e.g. in Hebrew, Greek, Latin, Coptic, Syriac, Arabic etc.). This series encourages multidisciplinary studies of the various philological, textual, and archeological sources concerned with the development of anthropological theories in ancient medicine, philosophy, religion, and theology, as well as the subsequent theoretical and practical interactions between these theories. Particularly welcome are studies that emphasise the fundamental connection between different philosophical, scientific, and socio-cultural contexts where anthropological theories were produced and applied, and that analyse the implications of these theories in ethical, ascetic, ecological, gender, and political life from classical Antiquity up to the Middle Ages. Attempts to understand human beings as biological, physiological, religious, and socio-cultural entities persisted from Antiquity and are echoed in the establishing of the complex and multifarious European identity. In grasping this cross-cultural and diversified process, one is able to see the foundations of contemporary scientific, religious, and political discourses that treat the human being and how humanity relates to the world.
Volume Editor: Hans Rothe
Im dritten und letzten Band der Studia Hymnographica liefert Hans Rothe zwei ausführliche Kommentare zum Gottesdienstmenäum nach ostslavischen Handschriften des 11. bis 13. Jahrhunderts.
So stellt der erste Beitrag eine ausführliche Untersuchung zur Bildung von Composita in der kirchenslavischen Hymnographie des Mittelalters dar unter besonderer Berücksichtigung der jeweiligen Übersetzungsvorlagen in den griechischen Quellen. Als Ergänzung ist ein Register aller Composita angefügt. In seinem zweiten Beitrag begründet er den Beginn des Kirchenjahres in der orthodoxen Kirche im September mit der hohen Anzahl an Sonderfesten, die in diesen Monat fallen. Zur Veranschaulichung dient die Edition eines der wichtigsten Sonderfeste, der Geburt der Gottesmutter am 8. September, die anhand der Moskauer Handschrift des Synodalmuseums vorgenommen und mit möglichen griechischen Quellen verglichen wurde.
In: Studia Hymnographica III
In: Studia Hymnographica III
In: Studia Hymnographica III
In: Studia Hymnographica III
In: Studia Hymnographica III
In: Studia Hymnographica III
In: Studia Hymnographica III