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These essays examine the relation between “philosophy,” an enterprise construed in various ways by Christian theologians, and the exegetical works of Greek and Byzantine interpreters. Though scholars often recognize the significance of philosophical traditions both for allegorical interpretation and for commentaries, they have paid less attention to the role of moral philosophy, for instance, in patristic moral exhortation. These essays explore wide a variety of ways philosophical traditions intersect with Eastern patristic exegesis.
Representaciones públicas y representaciones del poder en la Antigüedad tardía y Bizancio
Mujeres imperiales, mujeres reales reúne diversas contribuciones que estudian, desde una perspectiva pluridisciplinar (con enfoques que van de lo literario a lo antropológico, pasando por lo histórico-arqueológico), la evolución del poder femenino y su expresión pública desde la tardoantigüedad hasta el período bizantino tardío.
Los trabajos aquí reunidos consideran tanto la evidencia literaria como la material (pintura y escultura, numismática, epigrafía monumental). Por su carácter interdisciplinar, esta obra permite observar desde diversos ángulos las estrategias que facultaron a estas mujeres para ejercer el poder. Con su liderazgo en las cortes imperiales y reales, las mujeres que transitan por estas páginas consiguieron trascender el papel de meras madres de emperadores y reyes para convertirse en auténticas protagonistas de la política contemporánea.

Abstract

This contribution explores some actions of Aelia Eudoxia and Arcadius in religious matters to argue that they responded to a duly hierarchical, concerted strategy and with roles distributed between them. The Augusta played the effective and necessary co-operator role in certain initiatives that the emperor could not undertake without having his image diminished.

In: Mujeres imperiales, mujeres reales

Abstract

In Late Antiquity, where the main values are violence, heroism and war, some queens embody, either symbolically or in a real way, a pacifying and conciliatory role, which kings are often not allowed to show. In this work, I analyse a series of testimonies in which queens act as peaceweavers, peacemakers, peacekeepers and mediators. I show that, although these actions are not usually the most outstanding nor the most valued in the sources, they are essential for the well-being, survival and stability of the barbarian kingdoms.

In: Mujeres imperiales, mujeres reales

Abstract

Queens Liuwigotho and Cixilo, two of the last known Visigothic queens, are analysed in a case study to stress the problems of their historical contextualisation and the historiographical debate around their significance, as queens and as female characters in a time where few sources are available.

In: Mujeres imperiales, mujeres reales

Abstract

The episcopate of Gregory the Great is a turning point in pontifical relations with the eastern Roman Empire and the western Germanic kingdoms, in which empresses and queens played a prominent role that has not been fully recognised by historiography. Through his epistles, the Gregorian attitude towards women with power and their political transcendence is analysed.

In: Mujeres imperiales, mujeres reales
Author: Shaun Tougher

Abstract

This chapter focuses on Eudokia Ingerina, the wife of the founder of the “Macedonian Dynasty” Basil I (867–886). While Basil has been the subject of much attention, Eudokia has tended to be side-lined. The chapter puts her centre stage, analysing how she is prominently presented in texts and images from the reigns of Basil and her son Leo VI (886–912). The dynasty should be described as that of both Basil and Eudokia.

In: Mujeres imperiales, mujeres reales

Abstract

Many Byzantine empresses of the eighth and ninth centuries are barely visible in the historical record, appearing in brief and often unfounded accounts. Nevertheless, it will be argued that, despite the problems inherent in the sources, these empresses are regularly depicted in ways that betray their active role in the private and public spheres.

In: Mujeres imperiales, mujeres reales

Abstract

In AD 1077, the town of Raidestos rebelled against the Byzantine government. Knowledge of this rebellion and the fact that it was led by a woman known as “Batatzina” mostly comes from Michael Attaleiates’ The History. This article explores previous scholarly analyses of the rebellion and explains the inclusion of Batatzina and her uprising in The History.

In: Mujeres imperiales, mujeres reales
In: Mujeres imperiales, mujeres reales