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Aramaic, Hebrew, and Greek
Author: Anthony Meyer
This study brings together all ancient evidence to tell the story of the divine name, YHWH, as it travels in Aramaic, Hebrew, and Greek through the Second Temple period, the most formative era of Judaism.
During the Second Temple period (516 BCE–70 CE), Jews became reticent to speak and write the divine name, YHWH, also known by its four letters in Greek as the tetragrammaton. Priestly, pious, and scribal circles limitted the use of God’s name, and then it disappeared. The variables are poorly understood and the evidence is scattered. This study brings together all ancient Jewish literary and epigraphic evidence in Aramaic, Hebrew, and Greek to describe how, when, and in what sources Jews either used or avoided the divine name. Instead of a diachronic contrast from use to avoidance, as is often the scholarly assumption, the evidence suggests diverse and overlapping naming practices that draw specific meaning from linguistic, geographic, and social contexts.
Bibelauslegung in und durch Medien der Gegenwartskultur
Volume Editors: Anke von Legat and Michael Schneider
Große Botschaft in kleinen Texten: Gerechtigkeit, Frieden, Bewahrung der Schöpfung. Liebe gegenüber den Nächsten, aber auch den Feinden, und ein Leben über den Tod hinaus – das sind nur einige der theologischen Konzepte, die aus den biblischen Texten und Geschichten bis in die Gegenwart wirken.
Einerseits wird durch Medien öffentlich sichtbar, wie stark biblische Texte und von ihnen angestoßene Werte und Haltungen in der Gegenwart bedeutsam und gefragt sind. Andererseits sind Beiträge der Universitätstheologie in diesen kleinen Formaten nur selten zu finden. Was also müssen theologische Expert:innen lernen, um im öffentlichen Diskurs stärker beteiligt zu sein? Und wie können professionelle Medienleute an theologischem Fachwissen partizipieren, um biblische Themen und Thesen differenziert und wissenschaftlich fundiert für eine breitere Öffentlichkeit aufzubereiten?
Author: Bryan Beeckman

Abstract

Interest in the theology of the different Septuagint (LXX) books is vastly growing. In order to examine whether the LXX books reflect a different theology than the Masoretic Text (MT), I have recently analysed the additional attestations of ὁ θεός and ὁ κύριος in LXX Job and Proverbs without counterpart in MT (see Revue Biblique 128/4 [2021]; Louvain Studies 43/4 [2021] and Vetus Testamentum [forthcoming]). These studies, which focus on explicit differences between the Hebrew and the Greek text, have proven to be successful in describing (1) the (more nuanced) theology and (2) translation technique of both books.

This article examines the Hebrew divine אֱלוֹהַּ in Job without a counterpart in the LXX in order to contribute to a deeper understanding of the theology and translation technique of LXX Job.

In: Biblische Zeitschrift

Abstract

It is typically argued that in Ezek 20:5–26 YHWH thrice proposes or purposes to “pour out his wrath” on Israel, but then instead “acts on account of his name” – relenting from or deferring judgment. This paper argues instead, based on grammatical structure and intertextuality with the Pentateuch, that in at least one of these instances (and possibly two), Ezek 20 describes YHWH actually “pouring out wrath” and “exhausting anger” on some Israelites. This reading offers a new dimension for understanding intergenerational responsibility in Ezekiel.

In: Biblische Zeitschrift
In: Biblische Zeitschrift
In: Biblische Zeitschrift
In: Biblische Zeitschrift

Abstract

For John, Jesus’ exaltation on the cross and his exaltation to the Father coincide. From this perspective, a resurrection account could be missing. John adds it nevertheless in order to show the consequences of Jesus’ being exalted to the Father: Jesus brings from the Father God’s eschatological gifts. John uses the tradition of the earlier evangelists about the empty tomb, but in a critical way. This tradition belongs to the Synoptic Gospels as narrative texts and is influenced by early Jewish Apocalyptic and speculations about the raising of heroes of the past to God. The oldest traditions of the NT before and in Paul do not yet know this tradition.

In: Biblische Zeitschrift