Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 100 items for :

  • Ferdinand Schöningh x
  • Primary Language: English x
Clear All Modify Search
The scholarly purpose of the volume is to restate and describe the historical reception of John Duns Scotus’ meta-physics, which, by taking the real concept of “being as being” as the first object of first philosophy, laid the ground-work for what scholars have called “the second beginning of metaphysics” in Western philosophy.
Scotus outlined a theory of transcendental concepts that includes an analysis of the concept of being and its prop-erties, and a general analysis of modalities and intrinsic modes, paving the way for a view of metaphysics as a sci-ence of “possible being.” From the fourteenth to the eighteenth century Scotists invented and developed special concepts that could embrace both real being and the being of reason. The investigation of the metaphysics of the transcendentals by subsequent thinkers who were guided by Scotus is the central focus of the present collective book.
Editor: Christof Mandry
Medicine, ethics, and theology embrace various ideas and concepts regarding human suffering – ranging from pain, suffering from loneliness, a lack of meaning or finitude, to a religious understanding of suffering, grounded in a suffering and compassionate God.

In the practices of clinical medical ethics and health care chaplaincy, these diverse concepts overlap. What kind of conflicts arise from different concepts in patient care and counseling, and how should they be dealt with in a reflective way? Fostering international interdisciplinary scientific conversations, the book aims to deepen the discussion in medical ethics concerning the understanding of suffering, and the caring and counseling of patients.
Aramaic, Hebrew, and Greek
Author: Anthony Meyer
This study brings together all ancient evidence to tell the story of the divine name, YHWH, as it travels in Aramaic, Hebrew, and Greek through the Second Temple period, the most formative era of Judaism.
During the Second Temple period (516 BCE–70 CE), Jews became reticent to speak and write the divine name, YHWH, also known by its four letters in Greek as the tetragrammaton. Priestly, pious, and scribal circles limitted the use of God’s name, and then it disappeared. The variables are poorly understood and the evidence is scattered. This study brings together all ancient Jewish literary and epigraphic evidence in Aramaic, Hebrew, and Greek to describe how, when, and in what sources Jews either used or avoided the divine name. Instead of a diachronic contrast from use to avoidance, as is often the scholarly assumption, the evidence suggests diverse and overlapping naming practices that draw specific meaning from linguistic, geographic, and social contexts.
On Almsgiving and the Therapy of the Soul
Author: Junghun Bae
In recent years, there has been significant scholarly focus on John Chrysostom’s appropriation of ancient psychagogy, demonstrating that he was a skilled Christian physician of the soul who sought to promote the somatic and psychological health of his congregation by proposing preaching and various ascetic disciplines as medical treatments.
In these studies, however, relatively little attention has been devoted to his use of philosophical therapy in relation to almsgiving. To address this, this book aims to take a closer look at Chrysostom’s view of almsgiving and soul therapy within the context of ancient philosophical therapy. Ancient philosophers identified passions (πάθη), desires, and distorted thought as the diseases of the soul and developed various kinds of cognitive and behavioural remedies to cure these. Adopting an interdisciplinary approach between Greco-Roman philosophy and social ethics in early Christianity, particularly in the tradition of the Greek Fathers, what follows pursues a giver-centered analysis which has largely been ignored in the previous receiver-oriented research.
A rare scholarly attempt to focus on the last decade of Augustine’s life, this volume highlights the themes and concerns that occupied the aged bishop of Hippo and led him to formulate some of his central notions in the most radical fashion.
Augustine of Hippo’s last decade from 420 to 430 witnessed the completion of some of his most influential works, from the City of God to the Unfinished Work against Julian of Eclanum, from On the Trinity to the Literal Commentary on Genesis. During this period Augustine remained fully engaged as bishop and administrator, but also began to curate his legacy, revising his previous works and pushing many of his earlier ideas to novel and at times radical conclusions. Yet, this last period of Augustine’s life has received only modest scholarly attention. With a cast of international scholars, the present volume opens a conversation and makes the case that the late (wild) Augustine deserves at least as much attention as the Augustine of the Confessions.
The book presents the annotated texts of 21 songs of Eastern Mongol shamans. The transcriptions are kept in the Archives of Oral Literature of the Northrhine-Westphalian Academy of Sciences and Arts in Düsseldorf.
The publication contributes new knowledge of the history, ritual practices, beliefs and customs of the Qorčin (Khorchin) Mongol shamans of eastern Inner Mongolia in particular. It focuses on 21 shamanic songs performed for different purposes. They are sung by 8 shamans who were born in the first decades of the 20th century. The Mongol texts of the songs are supplied with an English translation, extensive commentaries, and melodies in numeric notation. The author analyses the 21 songs by making use of passages from songs belonging to the repertoire of other Qorčin Mongol shamans. The 21 songs were placed within a broad framework of Mongolian oral legends and heroic epics, showing that they also evoke themes recurring in different contexts. The book contains 18 photos taken by the author during field trips among the Qorčin shamans.
A Sourcebook
Volume Editors: Elena Marushiakova and Veselin Popov
This ground-breaking book is an impressively extensive collection of primary historical sources in various languages that reflect the history of the Roma (formerly referred to as ‘Gypsies’ in local languages).
The selection of the included materials reflects the authentic voice of the Roma themselves, and presents their visions and the specific goals pursued by the Roma civic emancipation movement. The source materials are published in original and translated in English, and are accompanied by explanatory notes and summarising comments discussing the specific historical realities and their interrelation to the Romani emancipatory movement in Central and Eastern Europe, thus presenting a comprehensive picture of the historical processes.
Erinnerungspolitik und historische Kontroversen in der Bundesrepublik 1945-1980. Übersetzt von Charlotte P. Kieslich
Wurden Papst Pius XII. und die katholische Kirche nach 1945 wegen ihres Verhaltens während der Herrschaft der Nationalsozialisten unverhältnismäßig in den Fokus gerückt?
Mark Edward Ruff untersucht die heftigen Kontroversen über das Verhältnis zwischen der katholischen Kirche und dem NS-Regime, die in der Bundesrepublik zwischen 1945 und 1980 ausbrachen – etwa über Rolf Hochhuths Schauspiel „Der Stellvertreter“ von 1963. Er beleuchtet dabei, warum diese kulturellen Gefechte so viel Kraft kosteten, die Schlagzeilen beherrschten, Klagen vor Gericht auslösten und zum Einschreiten von Außenministerien führten. Nach Ruff waren diese Kontroversen über die Beziehung zwischen Kirche und Nationalsozialismus oftmals Stellvertreterkriege um die Positionierung der Kirche in der „modernen“ Welt – in der Politik, internationalen Beziehungen und den Medien. Im Mittelpunkt dieser Auseinandersetzungen standen in den meisten Fällen Konflikte, die durch die gestiegene politische Bedeutung des Katholizismus und die Integration katholischer Bürgerinnen und Bürger in die Mitte der Gesellschaft ausgelöst wurden.
Latvians in the West after World War II
Author: Andrejs Plakans
The book is a group biography of the 175,000+ Latvians who fled their homeland during the final year of World War II (1944–45), lived until 1951 as refugees in Sweden and Germany, and then dispersed to other countries throughout the world.
The post-1945 history of these Latvians includes a description of their lives in ‘displaced person’ camps in post-war Germany, dispersion in the 1949–1951 years, resettlement in new host countries in Europe and overseas, strategies of adaptation to the new circumstances, organizational efforts, acculturation and assimilation, measures of cultural and linguistic preservation, renewal of contacts with the old homeland, generational change and disagreements, political mobilization, changes in personal and group identity, and, after 1991, the inclusion by the Latvian government of the descendants of this post-war population into a formally designated ‘Latvian diaspora’ (Diaspora Law, 2019).
Judith Butler is regarded as one of the most popular philosophers of the present. Famous for her theory of gender her wide-ranging work explored such themes as language, power, recognition, vulnerability, mourning, and grievability, revolutions, democratic movements, and resistance.
This book provides an overview of Butler’s rich scholarship and utilizes selected examples to present opportunities for a theological approach to her work. Of particular interest in this regard are the clear parallels between Butler’s thought and progressive theologies, such as Liberation Theology or the New Political Theology founded by Johann Baptist Metz. With attention to Butlers Jewish background, this unique interdisciplinary investigation bridges Butler’s thought, political philosophy, and Christian theology. Judith Butler and Theology considers how the reflections and insights of this critical intellectual can help set a constructive theology for the challenges of our century.