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Abstract

In the last few years, the Russian Orthodox Church (ROC) has increased its influence over the legislation of the Russian Federation. The ROC transports the ‘divine’ meanings onto secular legal standards, and the state takes over the substantive message of the relevant canon laws. The Russian leadership admitted the establishment of a symphonic relationship with the ROC between 2009 and 2018 in connection with the pontificate of Patriarch Kirill. The “spirit of symphony” stretches even to the new redaction of the Russian Constitution (2020) that speaks about “the faith in God, transmitted by the ancestors” (Art. 671.2), and defines and protects marriage as a heterosexual union (Art. 72.1ж 1). Although the church faces certain opposition to its anti-abortion stance, it has managed to lobby some pro-life reservations in procedural law. Besides, the recent close cooperation with the State Duma promises a further rapprochement between the ROC and the Russian state.

Open Access
In: Interdisciplinary Journal for Religion and Transformation in Contemporary Society

Abstract

The claim that Talmudic law is a religious legal system has long been, and continues to be, put forward by both traditional scholars of Jewish law and contemporary academic researchers. The question of whether Talmudic law is a religious legal system most certainly did not engage the Sages of the Talmud, but addressing it will help us grasp the nature of Talmudic law. Furthermore, juxtaposing Talmudic law to Biblical law will help us delineate the concept of religious law, and shed light on certain developments in the evolution of Jewish law.

Open Access
In: Interdisciplinary Journal for Religion and Transformation in Contemporary Society

Abstract

The Orthodox Christianity had in some respects divergent development from that of the West, which also resulted in several conceptions that might have had an impact on the contemporary legal situations in the predominantly Orthodox countries. In this contribution we aim at examining the impact of two major points of divergence. One is the cooperative Church–state separation, that is sometimes dubbed as the symphonia of the two. Another set of concepts that arguably marked Orthodox church’s understanding of the rule of law, at least in its internal procedures, is the principle of leniency (oikonomia). It allows for an interpretation of the laws in the interest of the person to which those are to be applied. We want to investigate which pieces of legislation might have been affected by these considerations and whether contemporary challenges of the legal system in Serbia can be traced to some of the Orthodox doctrines. We conclude that while the contemporary Church–state relationship, as envisioned in the corresponding law of the country, demonstrates many traits that can be traced to the symphonia tradition, there is hardly any evidence that would support the claim that the decision-making processes in Serbian courts were marked by conscious application of the principle of oikonomia.

Open Access
In: Interdisciplinary Journal for Religion and Transformation in Contemporary Society
In: Interdisciplinary Journal for Religion and Transformation in Contemporary Society
Author:

Abstract

The issue reflects on concepts of law determined or impacted by various currents of Abrahamitic religious traditions. Major alternative approaches regarding the status of revelation as a source of law are being addressed. Two basic types of religious approach can be distinguished: one embracing the idea of divine revelation containing prescriptions which are to be connected to and implemented in human legal and political reasoning, and another one absconding the divine from earthly political and legal paradigms in order to permeate them with relativizing spirituality. The various contributions explore the historical development of relevant strands of religious thought as well as the way in which they articulate themselves in the present-day diversity of a secularized and globalized environment.

Open Access
In: Interdisciplinary Journal for Religion and Transformation in Contemporary Society
Author:

Abstract

During the 1990s, a period representing the peak of often novel interpretations in human rights litigation by the judges of the Egyptian Supreme Constitutional Court, Egypt’s human rights performance was better than in other Islamic states sharing a commitment to the supremacy of Shari’a law. This article argues that there is a gap between the dogmatic assertion of the communal good life defined in traditional Islamic terms and the reality of governance usually at odds with these stipulations. The peculiar practice of the Egyptian Supreme Constitutional Court in the 1990s highlighted two crucial, related questions: first, was it in principle possible to narrow that gap and align governmental action to rules derived from scripture? Second, does the highly fragmented and inconsistent character of classical Islamic law offer advantages in its adaptation to modernity? This article claims that the relative progress towards compliance with international human rights standards was due to progressive and strategically litigating judges, who used Islamic law opportunistically rather than dogmatically.

Open Access
In: Interdisciplinary Journal for Religion and Transformation in Contemporary Society
Author:

Abstract

Rationalist Imāmī Shī‘ī’s attempt to deal with problems with which the Muslim society grapples on the basis of the rational potentialities of Shī‘ī jurisprudence. It refers to the claim of correlation between rulings dictated by human reason and those commanded by the divine texts. Certain scholars have attempted to offer a partial support of the rationalist stance. They try to show a middle way by which reason and the text may be kept under the same roof. Nevertheless, it does not seem that the partial defence works. Hence, a number of scholars have endeavoured to put forth a theory of identity of Shar‘ and reason. In this study, negative and positive arguments shall be introduced and appraised so that a justifiable conclusion on the issue may be offered. Overall, the breakthrough appears to lie in the different field of theories of axiology and religion, rather than jurisprudential reasoning and theology.

Open Access
In: Interdisciplinary Journal for Religion and Transformation in Contemporary Society
Gesamtausgabe: Bände 1–4
Das neue, deutschsprachige Referenzwerk
– print und online
– vier Bände mit über 2,600 Lemmata bzw. Stichworten
– zentrale Fachbegriffe in interreligiöser und ökumenischer Perspektive
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Zuverlässige und prägnante Informationen zu den grundlegenden Fragen des internen Rechts von Kirchen und Religionsgemeinschaften und des Religionsrechts.

Aufgrund der kirchlichen und gesellschaftlichen Veränderungen in den letzten Jahren stehen das Kirchen- und das Religionsrecht vor großen Herausforderungen und Modifikationen.
Die Herausgeber haben daher ein neues Lexikon für Kirchen- und Religionsrecht erarbeitet, dessen Ziel es ist, den Nutzern fundierte Orientierung und Informationen auf dem neuesten Stand der Forschung zum geschichtlich gewachsenen, geltenden eigenen Recht der Kirchen und Religionsgemeinschaften und zu deren rechtlichen Verhältnissen zum Staat zu liefern.
Das Lexikon für Kirchen- und Religionsrecht (LKRR) erscheint in vier Bänden, print und online in deutscher Sprache, und bietet in über 2,600 Lemmata bzw. Stichworten zuverlässige und prägnante Informationen zu den grundlegenden Fragen des internen Rechts von Kirchen und Religionsgemeinschaften und des Religionsrechts.

Ausrichtung und Ziel
Neben Fragen des staatlichen Rechts und des Kirchenrechts der katholischen und der evangelischen Kirche werden auch zentrale Inhalte des Kirchenrechts der orthodoxen Kirchen sowie des Rechts des Judentums und des Islams behandelt. Das Lexikon ist einer interreligiösen und ökumenischen Perspektive verpflichtet und eröffnet dem Anwender die Möglichkeit, die verschiedenen Rechtsbereiche zu vergleichen.
Die Mitarbeit von namhaften Wissenschaftlerinnen und Wissenschaftlern des staatlichen Rechts, des Religionsrechts sowie des katholischen, evangelischen, orthodoxen, jüdischen und islamischen Rechts garantiert fundierte und kompetente Informationen.
Das Lexikon ist sowohl für Theologen als auch für Juristen im Studium, in der Wissenschaft, in der staatlichen und kirchlichen Verwaltung sowie in der Seelsorge und beruflichen Praxis eine verlässliche und unerlässliche Informationsquelle.
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Dieses Referenzwerk ist auch erhältlich als Online Publikation.


The new German reference work
– print and online
– four volumes with more than 2,600 lemmas or keywords
– central terms in interreligious and ecumenical perspective
– high-quality equipment with linen binding with gold embossing
Reliable and concise information on the fundamental questions of the internal law of churches and religious communities and of religious law.

Due to the ecclesiastical and social changes in recent years, church and religious law faces major challenges and modifications. That is why the editors have developed a new encyclopedia for church and religious law. It provides users with a well-rounded orientation and information on the latest state of research regarding the history and current state of laws of the churches and religious communities and their legal relations to the state.

The Lexikon für Kirchen- und Religionsrecht (LKRR) is published in four volumes, print and online, in German, and offers reliable and concise information in over 2,600 lemmas or keywords on the fundamental questions of the internal law of churches and religious communities and of religious law.

This new extensive reference work for church and religious law covers the state law and the ecclesiastic law of the Catholic and Protestant churches. Beyond that it also includes canon law of the Orthodox churches as well as Islamic and Jewish law.

For theologians and lawyers in academia, state and church administration as well as in pastoral care and professional practice, this lexicon, developed by renowned specialists, offers reliable and up-to-date information.

–fast and easy research because of digital availability without DRM
–central terms in interreligious and ecumenical perspective
–with over 2,600 lemmas or keywords one of the most extensive representations of the faculty

This reference work is also available as an online publication.

Abstract

The paper aims at providing some introductory insights in the project of a theological anthropology of the digital age. The objective is to show that theological anthropology can help us gain an original and valid perspective on the technological transformation we have been experiencing during the last few decades. In order to do so, it is not enough to underline the analogy between some sources of the Judeo-Christian tradition and some aspects of the so-called digital culture. Instead, the objective is to show that theology can offer some theoretical instruments able to offer a deeper insight in our condition. The paper starts from the notion of finitude, interpreted as a blessing and not as a “limit” of our nature. Through the distinction between Promethean and Epimethan approaches to technology, the text focuses on three core aspects of human finitude: corporeality, inner life and otherness.

Open Access
In: Interdisciplinary Journal for Religion and Transformation in Contemporary Society
This series welcomes multidisciplinary research on the history of ancient and medieval anthropology broadly understood in terms of both its European heritage and its reception of, and engagement with, various cultural and intellectual traditions (e.g. in Hebrew, Greek, Latin, Coptic, Syriac, Arabic etc.). This series encourages multidisciplinary studies of the various philological, textual, and archeological sources concerned with the development of anthropological theories in ancient medicine, philosophy, religion, and theology, as well as the subsequent theoretical and practical interactions between these theories. Particularly welcome are studies that emphasise the fundamental connection between different philosophical, scientific, and socio-cultural contexts where anthropological theories were produced and applied, and that analyse the implications of these theories in ethical, ascetic, ecological, gender, and political life from classical Antiquity up to the Middle Ages. Attempts to understand human beings as biological, physiological, religious, and socio-cultural entities persisted from Antiquity and are echoed in the establishing of the complex and multifarious European identity. In grasping this cross-cultural and diversified process, one is able to see the foundations of contemporary scientific, religious, and political discourses that treat the human being and how humanity relates to the world.