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Abstract

Statues of the Virgin Mary have been embarking on various types of movement and migration for centuries. They are the fixed points around which religious activities are carried out in communities in Spain and Latin America and play significant roles in the personal and social lives of their devotees. Until recently, however, scholarship has largely overlooked the potential richness of what religious material cultures can tell us about religious transformation in Latin America. This paper therefore offers a theoretical and methodological advance by way of a ground-up, ‘material’ approach to understanding religious change through the religious statues themselves. It utilises the statue of the Virgen de la Regla in Chipiona, Spain as a node on a map from which to trace the lines of movement from Spain into Cuba where a replica of the same Virgin, another nodal point, is worshipped as both Virgin Mary and Santeria Orisha Yamaya.

Open Access
In: Interdisciplinary Journal for Religion and Transformation in Contemporary Society
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Abstract

Focusing on the Brazilian spirit-incorporation religion of Umbanda, this article proposes a theoretical shift in conceptions of hybridity: a move from asking “what ingredients mix in what manner to produce what result?” to asking “how do we interpret religious innovation?” This approach sees meaning as simply the result of interpretation (not in terms of a representational relation between words and world). It also underlines the centrality of discursive claims of hybridity and purity, as opposed to historical issues of origins – a point clarified by comparing “hybridity” to “tradition.” Comparison of Umbanda and Candomblé leads to the conclusion that each can be considered both “Afro-Brazilian” and “hybrid” in different ways. Candomblé exhibits semantic polarity (all groups accept that a certain sub-type is more authentic and hybridity marks divergence from that norm). Umbanda exhibits semantic plurality (wide variation between groups is not subject to such a normative judgment).

Open Access
In: Interdisciplinary Journal for Religion and Transformation in Contemporary Society
The book presents the annotated texts of 21 songs of Eastern Mongol shamans. The transcriptions are kept in the Archives of Oral Literature of the Northrhine-Westphalian Academy of Sciences and Arts in Düsseldorf.
The publication contributes new knowledge of the history, ritual practices, beliefs and customs of the Qorčin (Khorchin) Mongol shamans of eastern Inner Mongolia in particular. It focuses on 21 shamanic songs performed for different purposes. They are sung by 8 shamans who were born in the first decades of the 20th century. The Mongol texts of the songs are supplied with an English translation, extensive commentaries, and melodies in numeric notation. The author analyses the 21 songs by making use of passages from songs belonging to the repertoire of other Qorčin Mongol shamans. The 21 songs were placed within a broad framework of Mongolian oral legends and heroic epics, showing that they also evoke themes recurring in different contexts. The book contains 18 photos taken by the author during field trips among the Qorčin shamans.
In: Qorčin Mongol Shamans and Their Songs
In: Qorčin Mongol Shamans and Their Songs
In: Qorčin Mongol Shamans and Their Songs
In: Qorčin Mongol Shamans and Their Songs
In: Qorčin Mongol Shamans and Their Songs
In: Qorčin Mongol Shamans and Their Songs
In: Qorčin Mongol Shamans and Their Songs