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Editor: Christof Mandry
Medicine, ethics, and theology embrace various ideas and concepts regarding human suffering – ranging from pain, suffering from loneliness, a lack of meaning or finitude, to a religious understanding of suffering, grounded in a suffering and compassionate God.

In the practices of clinical medical ethics and health care chaplaincy, these diverse concepts overlap. What kind of conflicts arise from different concepts in patient care and counseling, and how should they be dealt with in a reflective way? Fostering international interdisciplinary scientific conversations, the book aims to deepen the discussion in medical ethics concerning the understanding of suffering, and the caring and counseling of patients.
On Almsgiving and the Therapy of the Soul
Author: Junghun Bae
In recent years, there has been significant scholarly focus on John Chrysostom’s appropriation of ancient psychagogy, demonstrating that he was a skilled Christian physician of the soul who sought to promote the somatic and psychological health of his congregation by proposing preaching and various ascetic disciplines as medical treatments.
In these studies, however, relatively little attention has been devoted to his use of philosophical therapy in relation to almsgiving. To address this, this book aims to take a closer look at Chrysostom’s view of almsgiving and soul therapy within the context of ancient philosophical therapy. Ancient philosophers identified passions (πάθη), desires, and distorted thought as the diseases of the soul and developed various kinds of cognitive and behavioural remedies to cure these. Adopting an interdisciplinary approach between Greco-Roman philosophy and social ethics in early Christianity, particularly in the tradition of the Greek Fathers, what follows pursues a giver-centered analysis which has largely been ignored in the previous receiver-oriented research.
A rare scholarly attempt to focus on the last decade of Augustine’s life, this volume highlights the themes and concerns that occupied the aged bishop of Hippo and led him to formulate some of his central notions in the most radical fashion.
Augustine of Hippo’s last decade from 420 to 430 witnessed the completion of some of his most influential works, from the City of God to the Unfinished Work against Julian of Eclanum, from On the Trinity to the Literal Commentary on Genesis. During this period Augustine remained fully engaged as bishop and administrator, but also began to curate his legacy, revising his previous works and pushing many of his earlier ideas to novel and at times radical conclusions. Yet, this last period of Augustine’s life has received only modest scholarly attention. With a cast of international scholars, the present volume opens a conversation and makes the case that the late (wild) Augustine deserves at least as much attention as the Augustine of the Confessions.
These essays examine the relation between “philosophy,” an enterprise construed in various ways by Christian theologians, and the exegetical works of Greek and Byzantine interpreters. Though scholars often recognize the significance of philosophical traditions both for allegorical interpretation and for commentaries, they have paid less attention to the role of moral philosophy, for instance, in patristic moral exhortation. These essays explore wide a variety of ways philosophical traditions intersect with Eastern patristic exegesis.
Volume Editors: Anna Usacheva, Jörg Ulrich, and Siam Bhayro
This volume explores the long-standing tensions between such notions as soul and body, spirit and flesh, in the context of human immortality and bodily resurrection.
The discussion revolves around late antique views on the resurrected human body and the relevant philosophical, medical and theological notions that formed the background for this topic. Soon after the issue of the divine-human body had been problematized by Christianity, it began to drift away from vast metaphysical deliberations into a sphere of more specialized bodily concepts, developed in ancient medicine and other natural sciences. To capture the main trends of this interdisciplinary dialogue, the contributions in this volume range from the 2nd to the 8th centuries CE, and discuss an array of figures and topics, including Justin, Origen, Bar Daisan, and Gregory of Nyssa.
Prestigious Manuscripts from around the Fifteenth Century in the Bavarian State Library Collection
From the outset, Christian theology was occupied with the question about the Son of God born as a child, and particularly with the birth of Jesus. Not until the late Middle Ages did artistic depictions begin to suggest the familiar atmosphere with which we associate Christmas celebrations today. During that time, artists transferred the event of God's incarnation into the environs of the affiuent European city-states, and they placed their conceptualizations of nature into surroundings not unlike our own. This exhibition presents the Christmas story as observed in European book illumination from around the fifteenth/sixteenth centuries in German, Flemish, French, and ltalian manuscripts. They belong to the most beautiful and valuable codices of this epoch held by the Bavarian State Library, and present illustrations of the Christmas story from the annunciation to the flight to Egypt.