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"Ausländerehen" in Deutschland 1870–1945
AutorIn: Christoph Lorke
Grenzüberschreitende Liebesbeziehungen im Wandel der Zeit; Heiraten über nationale und kulturelle Grenzen hinweg: Solche Liebesbeziehungen, die heute immer häufiger vorkommen, waren in der Vergangenheit aus unterschiedlichen Gründen umstritten.
Das Buch erzählt erstmals die Geschichte der (erfolgten und verhinderten) Eheschließungen Deutscher mit Nichtdeutschen. Dabei konzentriert sich das Buch auf die Zeit zwischen Kaiserreich und dem Ende des Zweiten Weltkrieges. Deutlich wird für diesen Zeitraum, wie umstritten solche intimen Grenzüberschreitungen immer wieder waren. Bürokratische Hürden und ausländerrechtliche Regelungen, zunehmend aber auch eugenisch-rassistische und stark ethnozentristische Ordnungsvorstellungen haben die Chancen solcher Ehevorhaben stark beeinflusst. Deutlich wird aber auch: Solche Eheschließungen veränderten die Wirklichkeit und Wahrnehmung der Aufnahmegesellschaften, sie führen zu neuen gesellschaftlichen Dynamiken und stellen Gewesenes vor neue Herausforderungen.
Hermeneutical, institutional and textual perspectives
The purpose of the volume is to explore how specific historical and socio-cultura conditions of late antiquity shaped the development of Christian thought.
The authors of the volume analyse various aspects of these conditions, particularly those of a textual and institutional nature, as they are reflected in the hermeneutic and philosophical principles of Christian discourse. This focus sheds new light on unexplored features of Christian literature, such as the influence of manuscript culture, early church institutions and practices, exegetical techniques, and philosophical curricula.
The Image of Japan’s Military Abroad
HerausgeberInnen: Frank Jacob und Sepp Linhart
Japan has always been fascinating for foreign observers. This volume will show, how its military has been perceived abroad and what image about the Japanese Army existed between 1853 and 1945 in the minds of those who read and heard stories from the Far East.
When forcefully opened by a US mission in 1853, Japan was transformed by its ruling elites into a strong nation state, whose military and political forces wanted to avoid a colonization by foreign powers. Therefore, Japan’s military capacities were of special interest and the army and navy were westernized very fast. Japanese soldiers became known as “Asia’s Prussians”, and were often described as “gallant enemies”. This image, however, should rapidly change after the First World War. During the battles in China since 1937, and the Pacific since 1941, the Japanese soldiers were often referred to as “devils.“ This volume will take a closer look at the images of Japan’s military abroad to show how these images were created, how they changed and what stimulated the differences with regard to the foreign perception of Japan and its military between 1853 and 1945.
The Jena-Plan as a Concept for a Child-Centred School
AutorIn: Ralf Koerrenz
“School as counter-public” is the hermeneutic key with which Ralf Koerrenz interprets the school model of the Jena Plan. Similar to the Dalton-Plan or the Winnetka-Plan, the Jena Plan is one of the most important concepts of alternative schools developed in the first half of the 20th century as part of the international movement for alternative education, the “World Education Fellowship”. Peter Petersen’s “Jena Plan” concept must be understood from his educational philosophical foundations. The didactic levels of action at school (teaching, learning) as well as the reflection of theory in pedagogical practice are made understandable by “school as a counter-public”. Not least with a view to the today’s Jena Plan schools, the question is asked for a context-independent core of what makes a school a Jena Plan school. The opportunities and ambivalences of the model thus become equally visible.
Apparition Narratives of the Early English Enlightenment
AutorIn: Michael Dopffel
Empirical Form and Religious Function provides a fresh perspective on the rise of empirical apparition narratives in the Anglophone world of the Early Enlightenment era.
Drawing on both well-established and previously unknown sources, Michael Dopffel here offers a fundamental reappraisal of one of the defining narrative genres of the 17th and 18th centuries. Intricately connected to evolving discourses of natural philosophy, Protestant religion and popular literature, the apparition narratives portrayed in this work constitute a hybrid genre whose interpretations and literary functions retained the ambiguity of their subject matter. Simultaneously an empirically approachable phenomena and a religious experience, witnesses and writers translated the spiritual characteristics of apparitions into distinct literary forms, thereby shaping conceptions of ghosts, whether factual or fictional, to this day.
From the Middle Ages to the 1990s
This book aims to create an integral picture of the social, economic and cultural history of the Jews in Lithuania during the course of more than six hundred years – from the Middle Ages to the 1990s. It is a translation of the study “Lietuvos žydai. Istorinė studija” (Engl. “Lithuanian Jews. Historical study”), published in Lithuanian in 2012. The Book was written by an interna-tional group of scholars from Lithuania, Israel, the United States of America and Germany.

The world of Lithuanian Jewry is reconstructed through different aspects of the development of community and society: demography, social and economic activity, self-government institutions of the community, cultural and religious movements, literature and the press, education, discriminative policy of the authorities and relations with the dominant church, segregation, assimilation and changes of identity, anti-Judaism and anti-Semitism, and the Holocaust.
The Urban Context of Conflict and Mass Destruction
HerausgeberIn: Tim Keogh
A crucial collection of new insights into a topic too often ignored in military history: the close interrelationship between cities and warfare throughout modern history. Scenes of Aleppo’s war-torn streets may be shocking to the world’s majority urban population, but such destruction would be familiar to urban dwellers as early as the third millennium BCE. While war is often narrated as a clash of empires, nation-states, and ‘civilizations’, cities have been the strategic targets of military campaigns, to be conquered, destroyed, or occupied. Cities have likewise been shaped by war, whether transformed for the purposes of military production, reconstructed after bombardment, or renewed as sites for remembering the costs of war. This conference volume draws on the latest research in military and urban history to understand the critical intersection between war and cities.
Virtue and Morality in the Chinese-German Dialogue
West-Eastern mirror discusses the formative cultural traditions in Germany/Europe and China with a special focus on the increasingly important aspects of “Virtue and morality”. At present, there are increasing difficulties in understanding the ‘other’ in their cultural framing. In view of the fact that economic or scientific exchange on an international level is a matter of necessity, in recent years the need to ensure the cultural prerequisites has become even more urgent. First, the title deals with the cultural influences in Europe (Judaism, Christianity, Enlightenment) and China (Confucianism, Taoism, Buddhism). In the second part, the focus encompasses a dialogue of European philosophy, with Rousseau, Herbart, Gadamer and Hegel.
Between Sacredness and Secularization
The purpose of this study about theological aspects of culture and social ethics is to investigate the relation between the theological tradition arising from Luther and the cultural immateriality which is culturally expressed in material progress and work. It is necessary to remember that it was Protestant theology itself that enabled this secularization process. Protestantism and modernity with its secularization proposal are processes that condition one another. Paul Tillich calls modernity and secularization the “Protestant Era” in the context of the Western culture of economic progress. It was mainly the theological tradition of the Enlightenment that separated the kingdom of the right from the kingdom of the left, law and gospel, creation and redemption, in such a way that the scope of creation became so autonomous that it dismissed the justification through the work of Christ, the gospel.
The Age of Nationalism and the Great War
HerausgeberInnen: Frank Jacob und Kenneth Pearl
War Memorials were an important element of nation building, for the invention of traditions, and the establishment of historical traditions. Especially nationalist remembrance in the late 19th century and the memory of the First World War stimulated a memorial boom in the period which the present book is focusing on.
The remembrance of war is nothing particularly new in history, since victories in decisive battles had been of interest since ancient times. However, the age of nationalism and the First World War triggered a new level of war remembrance that was expressed in countless memorials all over the world. The present volume presents the research of international specialists from different disciplines within the Humanities, whose research is dealing with the role of war memorials for the remembrance of conflicts like the First World War and their perceptions within the analyzed societies. It will be shown how memorials – in several different chronological and geographical contexts – were used to remember the dead, remind the survivors, and warn the descendants.