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The Second World War and Beyond
HerausgeberInnen: Frank Jacob und Kenneth Pearl
With the end of the Second World War, all its violence, war crimes, and sufferings as well as the atomic threat of the Cold War period, societies began to gradually remember wars in a different way. The glorious or honorable element of the age of nationalism was transformed into a rather dunning one, while peace movements demanded an end of war itself.
To analyze these changes and to show how war was remembered after the end of the Second World War, the present volume assembles the work of international specialists who deal with this particular question from different national and international perspectives. The contributions analyze the role of soldiers, perpetrators, and victims of different conflicts, including the Second World War. They show which motivational settings led to the erection of war memorials reflecting the values and historical traditions of the second half of the 20th and the 21st centuries. Thus, this interdisciplinary volume explores how war is commemorated and how its actors and victims are perceived around the globe.
Christopher R. Browning and Holocaust Historiography
Reflecting on the work of one of the field’s most influential scholars, the twenty essays in this book explore the evolution and application of Holocaust historiography, identify key insights into genocidal settings and point to gaps in our knowledge of humanity’s most haunting problem.Why do they kill?The publication in 1992 of Christopher R. Browning’s “Ordinary Men” raised crucial, previously unasked questions about the Holocaust: what made the members of a German police battalion – “middle-aged family men of working- and lower-class background” – become mass murderers of Jewish children, women, and men? How does motivation tie in with other factors that prompt participation in the “final solution”? And what can survivor accounts convey about genocide perpetration? Reflecting on the work of one of the field’s most influential scholars, the twenty essays in this book explore the evolution and application of Holocaust historiography, identify key insights into genocidal settings and point to gaps in our knowledge of humanity’s most haunting problem.
Die Antinapoleonischen Kriege in der deutschen Erinnerung
Dieses Buch erkundet die umkämpften deutschen Erinnerungen an die sogenannten Befreiungskriege gegen Napoleon (1813–1815) im langen 19. Jahrhundert. Die Zeit der Antinapoleonischen Kriege zwischen 1806 und 1815 nahm lange eine Schlüsselposition in der Geschichtsschreibung und im nationalen Gedächtnis des deutschsprachigen Raums ein, da die kollektive Erinnerung an diese Kriege eine zentrale Bedeutung für die Ausformung von konkurrierenden Vorstellungen der deutschen Nation und Nationalidentität hatte. Diese Erinnerung wurde nicht nur von politischen Interessen, sondern auch von regionalen, sozialen und geschlechtsspezifischen Differenzen geformt. Das Buch untersucht das umkämpfte Gedächtnis nicht nur anhand der populären, militärischen und akademischen Geschichtsschreibung, sondern auch sehr viel breitenwirksamerer Erinnerungsmedien wie Memoiren und Romane sowie kultureller Praktiken, insbesondere Feiern und Symbolen.
The Cultural Impact of the First World War
The battles of the First World War created a fundamentally new impression of war. Total warfare, the use of propaganda, chemical weapons, and every possible other measure to ensure victory defined the event that should later be known as the »Great War«, because it caused so many deaths and much suffering. The catastrophe also had an impact on the humanities, which inevitably had to deal with the processing of an event that seemed to be too big to be clearly understood by the human mind. The present volume covers several interdisciplinary perspectives by dealing with the impact of the war on the humanities during and after the conflict that deeply influenced the mindset of the 20th century.