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In: The Soviet and Post-Soviet Review
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In: The Soviet and Post-Soviet Review
In: The Soviet and Post-Soviet Review
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Abstract

In the hope of shedding some light on what it meant to be “Jewish” in the first century CE, and perhaps in other times, this article will closely examine what “everybody knows” about Tiberius Julius Alexander – that he was an apostate from Judaism – by carefully considering the arguments of earlier writers and critiquing them, in light of the events of his distinguished military and governmental career. It will also consider some remarks of his uncle Philo that others have thought relevant, and will offer an alternative narrative of his role as second in command of the Roman army in the Jewish War.

In: Journal of Ancient Judaism
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Abstract

David’s depiction in 2 Sam 15 shows his absolute faith in YHWH and his sole reliance on Him. This portrayal accords with Dtn 17,14–20 and contrasts sharply with the characterization of Absalom. The description of Ittai’s oath in YHWH’s name is deemed an example of adherence to YHWH by non-Israelites. The narrative portrays the ideal relationship between the people (the Israelites and foreigners) and YHWH. It is construed to depict the essential objective of the Deuteronomists in the postexilic period. Consequently, 2 Sam 15 does not belong to the so-called Succession Narrative; instead, it represents a Deuteronomistic narrative accomplished by the Deuteronomists in the postexilic period to express their theological ideals and opinions.

In: Biblische Zeitschrift
In: Biblische Zeitschrift

Abstract

In Ezekiel’s argument about idolatrous inquirers and persuadable prophets (Ez 14,1–11), how – if at all – does the restoration envisioned in V. 11 relate to the punishment envisioned in V. 10? In this essay I will assess a variety of older arguments about the relation of V. 11 to the preceding verses. In light of its outlook and vocabulary, I will argue that V. 11 has been composed in light of other passages in the book that emphasize divine transformation in the process of spiritual restoration.

Open Access
In: Biblische Zeitschrift
Free access
In: Biblische Zeitschrift
Author:

Abstract

2020 saw an unprecedented pro-democracy mobilization in Belarus. Indeed, protest actions against the grossly falsified presidential election and the authoritarian rule of Aliaksandr Lukashenka were impressive in many respects: number of participants, durability, frequency, and diversity. However, that year was also remarkable for mobilization of supporters of Lukashenka’s authoritarian rule: car rallies, pickets, and small-group marches in support of the incumbent lasted for months. Though far from being ubiquitous, a demand for autocracy does exist in Belarusian society. It can be explained by four factors: a tendency towards an economic trade-off, axiological Euroscepticism, the activity of pro-autocracy intellectuals, and the global decline in democracy.

In: Journal of Belarusian Studies