in The Soviet and Post-Soviet Review
AutorIn: Dennis Ioffe

Abstract

This article addresses the complex role of mushrooms, particularly that of the fly agaric (Amanita muscaria) [Russian: Mukhomor], in the art of Moscow conceptualism in a broad setting. This paper explores the mythopoetic theme of mushroom-induced beliefs, which influenced the Moscow conceptualists, and employs background historical scholarship by R.G. Wasson, V.N. Toporov, T.J. Elizarenkova, and others. Aside from the mushrooms per se that were particularly important for Moscow conceptualism, this article also mentions various ethno-botanical entheogens (i.e. biochemical substances such as plants or drugs ingested in order to undergo certain spiritual experience, or “generating the divine within”). Apart from analyzing the ethnobotanical historical background of manifesting hallucinogenic mushrooms on the Russian soil (including Siberia), this article focuses on Pavel Peppershtein’s novel Mifogennaia Liubov’ Kast (The Mythogenic Love of the Castes), which was co-authored with Sergey Anufriev. As the narrative of the novel unfolds, its main character, the Communist Partorg (Party Organizer) Dunaev, is wounded and shell-shocked at the very beginning of the Great Patriotic War (World War II). Partorg Dunaev finds himself deep in a mysterious forest, where he inadvertently snacks on unknown hallucinogenic mushrooms. He subsequently transforms into an exceptionally strong wizard who is capable of fighting spectral enemies both on earth and in heaven. The reader discovers the so-called “parallel war” sweeping over the Russian territory where legendary Russian/Soviet fairy heroes are locked in combat with their opponents, the characters of the Western children’s tales, and books. A heroic mushroom-eater, Partorg Dunaev joins one of the sides in this fight and gradually reaches the “utmost limits of sacrifice and self-rejection.” This article contextualizes the fungi-entheogenic episodes of Moscow conceptualism into a broader sphere of constructed visionary/ hallucinogenic reality by focusing on psilocybin fungi, particularly the fly agaric/Amanita muscaria/Mukhomor, and their cultural significance.

in The Soviet and Post-Soviet Review
AutorIn: Oleksii Rudenko

Abstract

This article examines the process of establishing the image of ancient slave rebellion leader Spartacus in the early Soviet era, with a focus on the 1920s and 1930s. Although the image of Spartacus in Soviet historiography has been investigated by scholars, the process of acculturation and reception of his figure within toponymy, onomastics, sport, and history-writing has not been researched as a holistic approach of Soviet propaganda. This article traces how and why Spartacus’s image became the primary figure of the classical antiquity in Soviet propaganda of the 1920s. The article argues that it was not Soviet historiography in the 1920s that shaped his image to be embodied in the Soviet narratives and public space. Rather, art, local toponymy, and sports created and promoted a particularly Soviet reception of Spartacus in the 1920s and 1930s which provided implications for socialist Central-Eastern European countries in the post-World War II era.

in The Soviet and Post-Soviet Review
Eine Stoffgeschichte der Kulturpflanze Raps (1897–2017)
Was 1897 auf einer kleinen Ostseeinsel seinen Anfang nahm, ist heute allgegenwärtig: als wogende gelbe Felder, als Biosprit und als gesundes Speiseöl. Raps –kaum eine andere Pflanze ist so sehr mit der deutschen Geschichte im 20. Jahrhundert verwoben.
Der Weg der Kulturpflanze führt von der Liebhaberei eines Pflanzenzüchters über die Ersatzstoffkultur in der Zeit der Weltkriege und die Agrarrevolution der Nachkriegszeit bis zum Rapsboom im Zeichen der Energiewende. Zugleich war Raps Teil der deutsch-deutschen Nachkriegsgeschichte. Den modernen Raps gab es als Diskursprodukt, bevor er als pflanzliche Realität existierte. Züchterische Leistungen verbanden sich mit einem Wechselspiel in einem breiten Kreis von Akteuren, der Landwirte und Konsumenten ebenso umfasste wie Wissenschaftler und Agrarpolitiker. Damit zeigt das Buch zugleich Perspektiven einer Stoffgeschichte, die nicht nur an der Oberfläche des Materiellen verharrt.
in Russian History