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Regional Perspectives in Global Context
Disciplinary and interdisciplinary research on all aspects of Central and Eastern Europe: history, society, politics, economy, religion, culture, literature, languages and gender, with a focus on the region between the Baltic and the Adriatic in local and global context.

Until Volume 9, the series was published by Brill, click here.

Abstract

A number of Estonian settlements were formed in Abkhazia in the 1880s. This article uses archival sources, written memoirs, diaries and secondary literature to focus on the experiences of Estonians in Abkhazia during the Russian Civil War until the establishment of Soviet power in 1921. The article discusses what role the proclamation of the Republic of Estonia played for the settlers, and what the change of status from an internal migrant to an emigrant meant for the Estonian community in Abkhazia, but also the political opportunities that the establishment of Estonia as an independent republic brought to compatriots living in the diaspora.

In: Caucasus Survey

Abstract

The paper is a case study of “Port-Petrovsk”, a large fishing and fish processing company in Makhachkala (Dagestan, Russia) that was purposefully driven to bankruptcy in 2007, leading some 5,300 people to lose their workplaces as well as access to many social services. The factory was bankrupted as there existed a small group willing to get rich on its assets. A considerable portion of the company’s former premises has already been sold and new apartment buildings have been erected there. Former workers and shareholders have been trying to reclaim their property and save the remaining company premises from being sold to developers. The case is presented against the background of what has been called elemental urbanization: a dynamic, chaotic and informal way of development of urban space in Makhachkala, one of the fastest growing cities in Russia. The whole process of conflict and negotiations around the company assets shows how property rights in Dagestan challenge the Western-set dichotomy of the individual versus the collective. Moreover, it presents property rights as a bundle that consist of legal, economic, and moral dimensions.

In: Caucasus Survey

Abstract

This article explores the perceptions of personal (in)security in the public space of Tbilisi, Georgia following the Rose Revolution in 2003. Based on the concept of vernacular security, I suggest a bottom-up approach to the subject, focusing on its culturally and socially specific character and observing the production of the discourses of (in)security at the intersecting notions of modernisation/backwardness, formality/informality, criminality/lawfulness, and the West/Russia, reflecting post-revolutionary political, social, and cultural transformations. While the government of the Rose Revolution introduced full-scale reforms formalising security in Georgia, the article reveals that citizens’ perceptions of personal (in)security in the public space are often ambiguous and even self-contradicting, as they waver between the notions of formality and informality, often interpreting the same phenomenon as a source of both their security and insecurity.

In: Caucasus Survey
Author: Maria Irod

The present volume is the fourth in a series of books that documents anti-war, feminist, and lgbt activism in the countries of the former Yugoslavia. What Marija Radoman terms as “collective academic-activist efforts” (p. 192) started with a collection of articles edited by Bojan Bilić and Vesna Janković (Resisting the Evil: (Post-)Yugoslav anti-war activism and its legacy. Baden-Baden: Nomos 2012) highlighting the diverse and rich array of anti-war and anti-nationalist initiatives in every republic of the former Yugoslavia. This scholarly endeavor at the cutting edge of social history and activist commitment continued with two books on

In: Southeastern Europe

Mass violence and atrocities attract scholarly and public attention, especially where the Balkans are concerned. However, like many of the phenomena that capture the public imagination, paramilitarism suffers from all too many publications of poor quality, which often rely on uncritically relayed legends, problematic sources and analysis of dubious quality. For all these reasons, the arrival of a book like Dmitar Tasić’s on paramilitarism in the Balkans provides a welcome antidote and an addition to the historiography.

The chronological scope of Tasić’s study is much broader than the deceptively narrow range indicated in the book’s title. Tasić takes a

In: Southeastern Europe
Author: Asim Mujkić
Introduction

It has always been a tremendous task in the fields of social and political science to write about an ongoing dynamic socio-political process in its overwhelming complexity. Usually the result of such a research or analysis consists of even more questions than at the beginning of the inquiry, and more of questions than possible answers. This has always been the double-edged sword of any such study. Instead of the usual research findings, clearly elaborated and presented, a decent social and political science, and especially a critical study, is considered successful if it results in clearly elaborated and presented questions.

In: Southeastern Europe

In the rich literature related to the analysis of the development of societies and States in the former Yugoslavia (fsry), the collection prepared by E. Mecca and S. Bianchini has the specificity that it is both an analytical instrument, but also a textbook for graduate students. As the title suggests, the work focuses on the issue of democratization and reconciliation in the Post-Yugoslav Space. These two issues are related to the process of European integration for various reasons. Therefore, three topics form a kind of triangle: reconciliation of the peoples and States of the former Yugoslavia depends on

In: Southeastern Europe

Honestly, it was an uneasy task to elaborate an edited textbook on democratization and reconciliation in the post-Yugoslav space. Although stemming from a 3-year research project carried out together with a strong international team of scholars and partners, the definition of its framework has required a careful balance of topics, narratives, and a selection of additional insights in order to make an interdisciplinary text easily accessible to a broader audience, including young readers who approach this issue for the first time. Therefore, both Eltion and I read with great pleasure and interest the comments of our reviewers who perfectly grasped

In: Southeastern Europe

“A language to be deciphered” – this is how Federico Giulio Sicurella describes his long-term fascination with the former Yugoslavia (p. 3), thus setting the stage for an insightful exploration of the role of intellectuals for nation-building practices. Sicurella is a research fellow at the Department of Sociology and Social Research at the University of Milano-Bicocca. His most recent contribution complements other books that delve into the various facets of nation-building in the post-Yugoslav context, such as Strategies of Symbolic Nation-building in South Eastern Europe, edited by Pål Kolstø (2014), and Framing the Nation and Collective Identities:

In: Southeastern Europe