in Experiment
in Experiment
AutorIn: Jeffrey Brooks

Abstract

Russian artists and publicists created a symbolic language of revolution in left-leaning satirical magazines during and after the Revolution of 1905. They reversed the traditional association of the occult with rebellion and pictured tsarist officials as monsters, vampires, and demons. They stigmatized the old order and portrayed death as its murderous ally. They also evoked death as an instrument of revolution. This essay explores the imagery they used and the context in which they worked.

in Experiment
in Experiment
AutorIn: Edward Portnoy

Abstract

This article considers the growth and development of Yiddish satire journals as a publishing phenomenon in the wake of the 1905 revolution, particularly in consideration of the unusual nature of the legal, political, and social positions of Jews in the Empire. Also considered is the proliferation of cartoons and their visual critiques of Jewish life.

in Experiment

Abstract

This essay explores verbal and visual appropriation of contemporary music and dance (both Russian and Western) by the 1905-1906 satirical journals to frame satirical messages and allusions. Considered are visual invocations of music and musicians, representations of music performances as well as song titles, songs, melodies, dance and dance music as framing satirical devices and sources of comedy.

in Experiment
in Experiment

Abstract

The Great Reform era in Russia, as well as the modernist movements in the Ottoman Empire and other Muslim lands represent the background against which the Muslims of the Russian Empire engaged in the scrutiny of the reasons behind the backwardness of their societies and began advocating the compatibility of Islam with modernity. After 1906, the Muslim press became the most important instrument in the creation of the public sphere where issues of tradition and modernity were debated. This essay focuses on the Tatar satirical journal Yalt-Yolt to explore its contribution to the critique of the old Muslim mentalité, as well as its role as an instrument of modernity.

in Experiment

Abstract

This article focuses on anti-Semitic cartoons published in the right-wing, satirical, illustrated newspaper Pliuvium, which appeared in Russia after the 1905 Revolution. The illustrated journal represented one of the new, far-right media outlets in the wake of the events of 1905 and its editors sought to redefine Russia as a traditional monarchy, home to ethnic Russians. To accomplish this aim, Pliuvium employed caricaturists who drew contrasts between Russians and Jews, turning the latter into the antithesis of the nation. Through close readings of several anti-Semitic images from the newspaper, the author seeks to reveal the broader historical forces contained within them. In the end, these cartoons help us understand the “unholy trinity” comprising the ugly side of Russian nationhood, racism in Russian imperial culture, and the emergence of far-right publics by 1905.

in Experiment
in Experiment