Acknowledgments

In: Naming God in Early Judaism
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Anthony R. Meyer
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Acknowledgments

This book is a revision of my doctoral dissertation from McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario. I am most grateful for the guidance and doctoral supervision of Daniel Machiela. His attention to detail, encouragement, and sincere desire to see this work through to completion was invaluable. I also thank Eileen Schuller and Stephen Westerholm for their extensive feedback on various chapters of this study, as well as my external examiner, Kristin De Troyer. Throughout my graduate school experience, my committee members modeled academic rigor, an unwavering commitment to precision in scholarship, and a dedication to bringing their students to the frontiers of knowledge in their respective fields of early Judaism and early Christianity. It has also been delightful to work with Martin Abegg, my MA advisor, who first introduced me to the academic study of the Dead Sea Scrolls. His love for texts and databases was infectious. I am grateful to the editors for accepting this manuscript in the SCCB series, notably Martina Kayser, Anselm Hagedorn, and Jeremy Hutton. Their comments and notes significantly improved the quality of this work. I also thank my colleagues in the department of Middle East Studies at the University of Michigan, where I worked as a Research Associate in Ancient Judaism and Rabbinic Literature and later as a Postdoctoral Research Fellow and Lecturer of Jewish and Roman History (2017–2018). This position afforded me time to research, write, and travel, during which I completed the initial revision of this book. The staff at the Israel Museum and Israel Antiquities Authorities were supportive and generous with their time as I examined fragments of the Greek Dead Sea Scrolls. My long-term academic colleagues, most notably John Screnock, Jarrod Jacobs, and Kipp Davis have contributed to the success of this study through feedback on select passages and numerous late-night conversations at annual/national conferences. To them—cheers. The generosity and support from many more colleagues, friends, and family over the years have made my academic career possible. I dedicate this book to Justina and our three children—Isaiah, Tessa, and Venture. The journey from graduate school to dissertation to publication spanned over a decade and was full of unpredictable turns. I could not ask for a better coterie of travelers with whom to share this path.

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