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  • Author or Editor: Sarah K. Danielsson x
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The Urban Context of Conflict and Mass Destruction
A crucial collection of new insights into a topic too often ignored in military history: the close interrelationship between cities and warfare throughout modern history. Scenes of Aleppo’s war-torn streets may be shocking to the world’s majority urban population, but such destruction would be familiar to urban dwellers as early as the third millennium BCE. While war is often narrated as a clash of empires, nation-states, and ‘civilizations’, cities have been the strategic targets of military campaigns, to be conquered, destroyed, or occupied. Cities have likewise been shaped by war, whether transformed for the purposes of military production, reconstructed after bombardment, or renewed as sites for remembering the costs of war. This conference volume draws on the latest research in military and urban history to understand the critical intersection between war and cities.
The series (Hi)Stories is an English publication project that deals with interdisciplinary questions in the field of War Studies.
Its main purpose is to highlight issues relating to war not only from a historical, but especially from a cultural perspective. It therefore focusses on the relationship between war and factors such as geography, gender roles, literature, art etc. Focusing on the papers delivered at a number of international conferences (e.g. War and Geography 2015, War and Rape 2016), the new series is an international forum for the publication of qualitative research works (dissertations or habilitations).
English was chosen as the language of publication in order to secure and reach an international audience and to provide a global network of researchers in the field of War Studies.
The Portrayal of Destruction and Mass Violence
The present volume provides a critical insight into the relationship of art and war. It shows how artists perceive war and how they depict it, to warn the spectator but to cure their own trauma at the same time.
War causes destruction, loss, and trauma. Many artists have used their art to express feelings and memories related to these losses and their own traumatic experiences. The artwork that came into existence due to such processes reflects on events of our past, but should be considered a warning at the same time. To deal with human suffering means to fully engage with the artist remains of human war experiences. The present volume aims to provide a critical insight into the relationship between art and war, showing how artists dealt with human losses, destruction, and personal trauma.