Abstract

The Apocalypse of Elijah is an early Christian text that recycles earlier eschatological traditions, offering an idiosyncratic account of the defeat of the Antichrist and the end of the world. This article investigates the origins and internal logic of the eschatological scenario narrated in this text. In contrast to previous scholarship, we argue that this scenario is not a hodgepodge of various mutually exclusive Jewish and Christian traditions but a systematic account of the eschatological events.

In: Christian Discourse in Late Antiquity
Hermeneutical, institutional and textual perspectives
The purpose of the volume is to explore how specific historical and socio-cultura conditions of late antiquity shaped the development of Christian thought.
The authors of the volume analyse various aspects of these conditions, particularly those of a textual and institutional nature, as they are reflected in the hermeneutic and philosophical principles of Christian discourse. This focus sheds new light on unexplored features of Christian literature, such as the influence of manuscript culture, early church institutions and practices, exegetical techniques, and philosophical curricula.