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Author: Stephen Page

craft new constitutional arrangements that reflect the fundamental social, political, and economic changes that have developed since the late 1980s. Sharlet has adopted as a point of departure for viewing the final twenty-five years of Soviet history what he calls the "interface of politics and law' and

In: Canadian-American Slavic Studies

dividing line between state and society was not always sharp, and collective identities in many ways reflected popular aspirations (and in many other ways did not!) into the 1970s (as the author often suggests), then Soviet history begins to look even more different from the totalitarian models rejected

In: Canadian-American Slavic Studies
Author: Steven Hugh Lee

twentieth- century Russian and Soviet history, begins, appropriately, with a brief tribute to Adam Ulam himself, a postwar Polish emigre who joined Harvard's Government Department at the onset of the Cold War in 1947. In the context of the global rivalry between the Soviet Union and the United States Ulam

In: Canadian-American Slavic Studies
Author: Peter Kenez

's monograph covers an extremely important period in Soviet history during which time, one can argue, the basic institutions a n d - more important - "ethos" of the Soviet state were developed. As Blank points out, Narkomnats reflected this development in its lack of clear plan or direction at the outset, the

In: Canadian-American Slavic Studies

would have solved the nationality question is highly speculative and dubious at best. Blank's monograph covers an extremely important period in Soviet history during which time, one can argue, the basic institutions a n d - more important - "ethos" of the Soviet state were developed. As Blank points out

In: Canadian-American Slavic Studies

often de-emphasized aspect of early Soviet history and argues persuasively that international affairs played a key role in influencing immediate and long-term political and economic developments in the Soviet republic. The author's demonstration of the contradictory nature of Soviet foreign policy

In: Canadian-American Slavic Studies
Author: Eugene Huskey

the elite from world civilization, by destroying a growing market economy, and by creating new forms of economic and psychological dependency. An assessment of the burden of Soviet history would have made even more comprehensible the failures of the El'tsin era. In a more immediate sense, Steele links

In: Canadian-American Slavic Studies

essays in this volume demonstrate this very well. Stalinism and Soviet Cinema begins with Derek Spring's concise but highly intelligent survey of "Stalinism - the Historical Debate" (a work that could be used, with profit, in Soviet history courses). Among other articles contextualizing this material

In: Canadian-American Slavic Studies

Soviet regime in the 1960s and 1970s. Bukovsky stands out in Soviet history as one of the greatest heros who, when given the choice to.compro- mise his abhorrent convictions toward the Soviet authorities, preferred being arrested four times, resulting in fifteen years of incarceration in prisons and

In: Russian History

SYMPOSIUM* THEODORE H. VON LAUE (Worcester, MA, U.S.A.) GORBACHEV IN HISTORIC PERSPECTIVE As a statesman of extraordinary impact Mikhail Sergeevich Gorbachev can be properly assessed only in the context of Russian/Soviet history viewed through time comparatively in the global framework. As

In: The Soviet and Post-Soviet Review