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policy regarding the family and gender are shown, where it proved impossible to unambiguously apply ‘conservative-liberal’ or ‘tradition- al-liberal’ distinctions in both policy and reality. KEYWORDS: gender equality, law, Soviet society, social history, Soviet history. Soviet propaganda constantly

Open Access
In: Lithuanian Historical Studies

von einem Kriegsschauplatz zum nächsten ermöglichen und 8. im Kriegsfall die Evakuierung aller nördlichen Fischkutter und deren Ein- satz als Kriegsschiffe sicherstellen.44 41 E. A. Rees, Stalin, the Politburo and Rail Transport Policy, in: ders/Julian Cooper/Maureen Perrie (Hrsg.), Soviet History

In: Zwangsarbeit als Kriegsressource in Europa und Asien
Author: Una Bergmane

Cold War and Soviet history. The story centers on the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA), an international think-thank established in the age of detente to foster East-West scientific collaboration. While the institutional history of the IISA constitutes the core of the

Open Access
In: Lithuanian Historical Studies

intricacy, Švedas regards Soviet history writing through the lens of generations and paradigms. Namely, the analytical story of the construction of Soviet-era historiography is told from the perspective of generational and paradigmatic consensus building and differentiation. We should admit that a

Open Access
In: Lithuanian Historical Studies

left on the margins of Soviet history. As a result, it is no surprise that in places like the Ninth Fort in Kaunas and Paneriai, the actual identity of the people killed there was never revealed, being veiled by the concept ‘victims of the fascist terror’ (pp. 175, 193). The scale of the Holocaust

Open Access
In: Lithuanian Historical Studies
Author: Tomas Vaiseta

was later published as ‘A Revolution of their Own: Voices of Women in Soviet History’ (1998). It is symbolic that this conversation has only now been made public, even though it reveals problems and insights associated with the oral history method that are later encountered in the writings of

Open Access
In: Lithuanian Historical Studies

that the reader will not get an adequate picture of Lithuania’s situation ‘on the eve of the Holocaust’. Neither will one gain a proper understanding of the nature of Soviet repression in the Baltics in 1940–1941, since this compendium avoids analysis of the wider context of Soviet history during

Open Access
In: Lithuanian Historical Studies

1972. Although the May 1972 events are frequently discussed in the Lithuanian popular press, Kalanta’s death and the ensuing street demonstrations have received limited attention by scholars of Lithu- anian or Soviet history. When they are mentioned in English-language works on the Soviet Union, the

Open Access
In: Lithuanian Historical Studies
Author: Beate Fieseler

, S. 138-159, S. 153. 49 Malakhova, Vera I.: Four Years as a Frontline Physician. In: Alpern Engel, Barbara/Po- sadskaya-Vanderbeck, Anastasia (Hg.): A Revolution of Their Own. Voices of Women in Soviet History, Boulder-Oxford 1998, S. 175-218, S. 177. Rotarmistinnen im Zweiten Weltkrieg 311

In: Soldatinnen