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Author: Thomas M. Bohn

by Jerzy Kosiński (1933–1991). In both cases commentaries that supplement the main texts offer insights into Soviet history, on the one hand into the revolutionary culture of the 1920s, and on the other hand into the political thaw of the 1950s. 10 1 Time Window I : The Bagpipe Player or

In: Journal of Belarusian Studies

analyzes representations of Soviet socialism in post-Soviet history textbooks and in the life stories of history teachers in Kyrgyzstan. It aims to explore, first, how the post-Soviet Kyrgyz state reconstructs its Soviet past in school history textbooks, and, second, how history teachers—as both

In: Central Asian Affairs
Author: Jaroslaw Anders

been caused by the fact that in Soviet times the attention of Western diplomats, media, and nongovernment organizations was usually focused on Moscow (and perhaps Leningrad). Another possible cause, according to the author, was the country’s post-Soviet history. The authoritarian regime of Alexandr

In: Journal of Belarusian Studies

did not use his memoirs in her book at all.1 The book would benefi t a lot from being linked to existing global scholarship on Soviet history as far as methodology and concepts are concerned. The fact that this was not done is especially remarkable because the author actually made some, although

Open Access
In: Journal of Belarusian Studies
Author: Ina Shakhrai

stresses the interconnection between the current political situation in Belarus, Soviet history and the post-Soviet region. Using the case of Alexievich’s Nobel Prize, it analyses how autocratic elites learn from the past, and how diffused norms shape public attitudes in neighbouring autocracies. The

Open Access
In: Journal of Belarusian Studies

mood, such that it is seeking balance between the two extremes of this issue. Gjerde believes that since 2000, the Russian government has been searching for a new relationship with Soviet history, attempting to balance itself between the two active social trends of Stalinism and anti-Stalinism. Based

In: Russian Politics

the documentation which he quotes, the author puts forward a convincing case in support of the classical Byelorussian thesis. St. Stankievič traces the fluctuating fortunes of the first Byelorussian literary journal Naša Niva in various phases of Soviet history (91-115). Published first in

Open Access
In: Journal of Belarusian Studies

for all its aspirations and theoretical promise, the Yeltsin constitution was still a product of Russian and Soviet history. In recognition of its Soviet inheritance, the constitution referred to the country as a social state and listed several social rights: education, health care, the right to a

In: Russian Politics
Author: Graeme Gill

this regard was legislation that prohibited Russian ngo s from accepting financial support from non-Russian sources. Any group that did accept such support had to register as a “foreign agent”, a term that had a chilling resonance for those knowledgeable about Soviet history. The effect of this

In: Russian Politics

Putin. Moreover, the numbers of arrests during this wave of demonstrations across were the biggest in post-Soviet history. 24 As explained earlier, the time frame of Putin’s third presidency was chosen due to several factors. First, despite aggressive governmental response to the so-called Bolotnaya

In: Russian Politics