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across Europe, opens up new prospects. 15 In this context, Soldat suggests a new demystification, this time – of the history of the ‘massacre of Novgorod’ by oprichniks in 1569–1570. This tragedy is considered to be one of the bloodiest and most notorious crimes of the tyrant Ivan the Terrible and his

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by two brothers Grigor’ii and Fedosei, sons of Boris Bachmanov. They were members of an established pomeshchik family in Bezhetskaia piatina, the eastern sector of the Novgorod lands. Their father Boris, the son of Nikifor Bachmanov, had possessed pomest’e lands in two parishes ( pogosty

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institutions, namely, collective bodies and magistrates. While the latter do not in fact pose any serious problems (it is generally agreed that the highest officials in Novgorod were the bishop/archbishop, the posadnik, the tysi͡at͡skiǐ, later known as the stepennoǐ posadnik and stepennoǐ tys�͡at͡skiǐ , and

In: Russian History

do is make as strong a case as possible for her conclusions in the hope of raising new questions, advancing new analyses, and furthering historical knowledge. In “Novgorod Counter Histories around 1700, The Story of Ivan the Terrible’s Raid of Novgorod Reconsidered” Cornelia Soldat accomplishes those

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over and over again, sometimes even in the same the same order. This led me to a greater comparative textual analysis. The results of this analysis and the conclusions that may be drawn from it, I am showing in this article on the example of the 1570 raid of Novgorod by Ivan the Terrible. My analysis

In: Russian History

of Novgorod the Great in the late 16th–early 17th centuries through documents of local legal proceedings. The court system refers here to the hierarchy of courts, their purviews, subject matter and territorial jurisdictions, and the exact types of cases heard and adjudicated. 1 Sources

In: Canadian-American Slavic Studies

community of Russianists. At the University of Michigan, he spoke about Ivan the Terrible’s assault on Novgorod, work that took shape in chapters of his various publications on the Oprichnina and in his book on “The Tragedy of Novgorod.” 1 In the spirit of that work, I submit this small piece on

In: Canadian-American Slavic Studies
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wit into the tedium and drudgery of meticulous scholarship—a true model for all of us! … Truly, what firmness the ‘Franks’ maintain for their faith! The Kaiser’s envoy told me how the Spanish King purged his land …. archbishop gennadii of novgorod (1490) ∵ Introduction The

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like Viking operations, including the ‘golden bows’ ( gylte stampna ) of their ships, the king launched the expeditions. 14 The Baltic crusades in the early thirteenth century were already actions of ecclesiastic and royal power, and the Hansa replaced the Vikings as traders between Novgorod and the

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’s growing military and administrative needs with existing personnel drawn from the boyars, “embarked on a large-scale program of social engineering” (p. 216). Grand Prince Ivan iii launched the effort when he distributed pomest’ia , conditional land grants, in the recently annexed territory of Novgorod

In: Russian History