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of stil modern or Russian Art Nouveau. During the period of the church’s construction, the members of the circle organized expeditions to collect “items of peasant daily life and other architectural decorations,” which formed the basis of the Abramtsevo collection of folk art. 2 The distinctive

In: Experiment
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Experiment/3KcnepHMeHT, 7 (2001), 209-30. ELIZABETII DURST RUSSIAN ART NOUVEAU ;FASHION The dominant trends in Russian women's fashion of the early twentieth cen- tury complied with West European standards, as they had since Peter the Great's reforms. Women and their dressmakers in the leading

In: Experiment
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Tolstoi 4 ; Dani Savelli discussed the historical context of the creation of Versailles with reference to Benois’s memoirs and the artist’s future theatrical designs. 5 Russian scholar Boris Sokolov, in his article devoted to the images of gardens in Russian art, identified the theme of Versailles as

In: Canadian-American Slavic Studies
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Russian art ever presented to a Western audience. 1) Less familiar, however, is the smaller version of the same show that Diaghilev prepared for the “VII Esposizione Internazionale d’arte” in Venice in 1907 (Figs. 8-10). 2) The reopening of the Archivio Storico delle Arti Contemporanee (ASAC) at the

In: Experiment

Experiment/3KcnepHMCHT, 7 (2001), 335-64. ALEKSEI FEDOROV-DA VYDOV Architecture RUSSIAN ART OF INDUSTRIAL CAPITALISM1 (1929)* The subjugation of artistic architecture to the methods of painting was a con- sequence and a symptom of architecture's ptofound decline and degeneration as an art

In: Experiment

MARIE TURBOW LAMPARD (New York, U.S.A.) Sergei Konenkov and the "Russian Art Exhibition" of 1924 * On 5 January 1924 a small item in the New York Times reported that Constantine Somov, " 'one of the most talented and distinguished of living Russian painters' was planning to organize an

In: The Soviet and Post-Soviet Review
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Benois, developing the notion of a major exhibition as early as 1900. As Benois wrote that year in Mir iskusstva , “A great service to the historiography of Russian art would be rendered by he who could organize a single, general exhibition of eighteenth-century Russian painting. . . . No doubt, such an

In: Experiment

Аннотация

Статья посвящена жизни и творчеству художника Сергея Петровича Лодыгина (1892–1948), талантливого графика, иллюстратора, сценографа, работавшего на стыке русского модерна и советского ар-деко. Разбирая перипетии судьбы, источники изобразительной манеры и то, что удается обнаружить из сравнительно небольшого по объему сохранившегося до настоящего времени наследия Лодыгина, автор показывает, что фигура художника не сводима к традиционно приписываемой ему роли одного из русских эпигонов Обри Бердсли, а обладает собственным, вполне оригинальным стилем и заслуживает достойного места в истории отечественного искусства.

In: Experiment
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enquire as to] the objective existence of the formal method.... We had to start with Berenson and Wölfflin, from whom we derived the essence of the formal method, and then passed on to the group of heretics who, volens nolens, were its critics."7 Characteristically, the Russian art historians studied not

Open Access
In: Experiment
Art, Material Culture, and British-Russian Relations
Volume Editor:
“Courtly Gifts and Cultural Diplomacy” explores the history of British-Russian state relations from the perspective of art and material culture. This richly illustrated book presents manifold practices of courtly gift-giving and vivid case studies of British-Russian artistic diplomacy over the centuries. It traces a visual and material history of cross-cultural dialogue that starts with an early English map of Russia made in the 16th century and ends with gifts of Fabergé art objects and domestic photographs exchanged between the British royal family and the family of Tsar Nicholas II in late Imperial Russia. Twelve expert authors from academia, the arts, and the museum sectors in Britain, Russia, and the United States present new narratives and critical interpretations based on material from previously unexplored archives. Their diverse approaches reveal the importance of artistic diplomacy and the agency of gifts of art and material culture in courtly and state relations.