Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 441 items for :

  • All: "Uzbekistan" x
  • Search level: All x
Clear All
Authors: Yaacov Ro’i and Alon Wainer

* The article is published as part of the ceria (Central Eurasia-Religion in International Affairs) Initiative, generously funded by the Henry Luce Foundation. Uzbekistan came into being as an independent nation-state with the break-up of the Soviet Union toward the end of 1991, retaining

In: Central Asian Affairs
Author: Bekzod Zakirov

This article is concerned with understanding the durability of the political system that emerged in Uzbekistan through the course of its independence under its first president, Islam Karimov. I argue that the concept of patronal presidentialism developed by Henry Hale can be used to explain the

In: Central Asian Affairs

scarcely any historical or contemporary interaction with Afghanistan; while Turkmenistan occupies a specific place and considers itself to be largely protected from any risks thanks to its isolationist policies. This leaves Uzbekistan and even more so Tajikistan as the two main Central Asian states for

In: Central Asian Affairs

* Part of this research was funded by the uk’s Economic and Social Research Council project ‘Rising Powers and Conflict Management in Central Asia’. In early June 2010, when interethnic clashes between the Kyrgyz and Uzbeks erupted in South Kyrgyzstan, many Kyrgyzstani citizens had hoped that

In: Central Asian Affairs

* This article covers the period up until 2016, and does not represent the new policies of the current Uzbek government. Introduction The best virtue among the virtues that were given to humanity is ethics. IMāM AL-BUKHāRī Proverbs, slogans and ethical messages are embedded in

In: Central Asian Affairs

. 7 However, the scholarship tends to agree that civil society has a role to play in democratic governance. Due to the dominance of the state in all aspects of life, civil society was largely absent in post-Soviet Uzbekistan. 8 Up until late 2016, the country was known as one of the world’s most

In: Central Asian Affairs
Author: Slavomir Horák

Introduction The death of the first president of Uzbekistan was officially announced on September 2, 2016, after several days of waiting and apparent intra-elite discussion about the distribution of power that would follow. During the interim period, analysts from all over the world

In: Central Asian Affairs

branches are “a single thing that can magically solve educational woes.” 6 Uzbekistan’s HE policy and media discourse on the topic gives the impression that Tashkent is indeed expecting foreign university branches to solve all the existing issues in its local HE system: the government is relying only

In: Central Asian Affairs

the presidents of Uzbekistan and Tajikistan have attempted to harness a new approach to visual imagery to reach an audience, and how the audience responds to that identity projection. It attempts to explore the official presidential accounts in depth and to note the responses (likes and comments) on

In: Central Asian Affairs
Author: Russell Zanca

You know about Uzbeks: no matter how much we complain, at the end of the day, if there is something good and tasty cooking, we consider that life is pretty good . —A friend who contacted me by e-mail in 2007 as I checked some points about village migration patterns with him. This essay

In: Central Asian Affairs