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1 Introduction Several recent studies have advanced the thesis that ancient Judaism and the emerging Christian movement took up the Middle Platonic trichotomic model of the human being. 1 Plato’s anthropology is not uniform. It offers points of reference for various, sometimes

In: Journal of Ancient Judaism

1 Introduction Thinking about theological anthropology’s possible contribution to the debate on the human condition in our era, in particular after the so-called “digital turn”, 1 is quite a challenge. At a first glance, it seems in fact that an actual understanding of digital culture is

Open Access
In: Interdisciplinary Journal for Religion and Transformation in Contemporary Society

1 Introduction Catholic teaching and Catholic ethicists espouse an objective meta-ethic, the good can be defined and is defined as human dignity. What facilitates human dignity is good and right, what frustrates human dignity is bad and wrong. A fundamental anthropological and ethical

Open Access
In: Interdisciplinary Journal for Religion and Transformation in Contemporary Society
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The intellectual emergence of a unified field of anthropology and ethnography in the Habsburg Empire’s capital already had begun several decades before its institutional establishment in 1876, when the Natural History Museum ( nhm ) in Vienna opened with a distinct department for Ethnographie

In: East Central Europe

: “New as the science of anthropology is, it attracts a great deal of attention among the educated public. Man wants to know his own species” ( bh 4, no. 203, 24 July 1884, 4). In the Budapest case, however, business aspects of the human displays staged at the Zoo were also emphasized as vital

In: East Central Europe
This series welcomes multidisciplinary research on the history of ancient and medieval anthropology broadly understood in terms of both its European heritage and its reception of, and engagement with, various cultural and intellectual traditions (e.g. in Hebrew, Greek, Latin, Coptic, Syriac, Arabic etc.). This series encourages multidisciplinary studies of the various philological, textual, and archeological sources concerned with the development of anthropological theories in ancient medicine, philosophy, religion, and theology, as well as the subsequent theoretical and practical interactions between these theories. Particularly welcome are studies that emphasise the fundamental connection between different philosophical, scientific, and socio-cultural contexts where anthropological theories were produced and applied, and that analyse the implications of these theories in ethical, ascetic, ecological, gender, and political life from classical Antiquity up to the Middle Ages. Attempts to understand human beings as biological, physiological, religious, and socio-cultural entities persisted from Antiquity and are echoed in the establishing of the complex and multifarious European identity. In grasping this cross-cultural and diversified process, one is able to see the foundations of contemporary scientific, religious, and political discourses that treat the human being and how humanity relates to the world.

highlight how linguistic affinity was intimately tied to ethnic and racial identity, from the beginning of the twentieth century, anti-Yugoslavist Croat nationalists started to look to racial anthropology as a scientific tool that could establish clear delineations between linguistically related peoples (in

In: East Central Europe
Bruno J. Clifton examines Israel's family dynamics and identity politics in the dramatic narratives of Judges in an interdisciplinary study that brings socio-anthropological research into dialogue with the history and culture of ancient Israel. This monograph discusses the social experiences and interactions through which people in Israel might have viewed their place in the world. Institutions such as hospitality, marriage and community leadership are examined and the ethnicity, culture, social landscape, family life, and literature of ancient Israel are explored with a view to determining what impact the understanding of identity has on the interpretation of the stories in the Book of Judges.

The opportunity offered by this volume enables me to outline a narrative of Gregory of Nyssa’s anthropology that reveals his conception of the unity of body and soul in the human being. Since Nyssen’s anthropology is very closely linked to the interpretation of Gen 1:26–28, and since, in the

In: The Unity of Body and Soul in Patristic and Byzantine Thought
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East Central Europe/ECE, vols. 34–35, 2007–2008, part 1–2, pp. 161–184. Abstract: This article argues that historical anthropology provides approaches for the exploration of previously neglected problems of the history of Southeastern Europe. Historical anthropology is not seen as a fixed set of

In: East Central Europe