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Author: Elena Maltseva

liberal pension reform, viewing it as the only viable solution to the problem of old-age pension security. However, institutional legacies, which manifested in the form of electoral expectations and veto players defending the old order, prevented substantive reforms. 1 As a result, during the 1990s

In: Russian Politics

wide range of issue areas has been met with new tools to contain it. The limited protests after the 2018 pension reform demonstrated state capacity to bound mobilization to local actions by controlling the organizational capacity of trade unions and systemic parties, especially the KPRF . 25 As the

In: Russian Politics
Author: Julie Hemment

Andrea Chandler. Shocking Mother Russia: Democratization, Social Rights, a n d Pension Reform in Russia, 1990-2001. Toronto: University o f Toronto Press, 2004. xii, 246pp. $60.00 Cdn. At a time when pensions, social benefits (lgoty) and social welfare are once again sub- ject to contentious

In: Canadian-American Slavic Studies

by newsbreaks, as will be showed below. Figure 1 shows the distribution of publications (2010–2015) on pension reform. The majority of relevant articles on pension reform were published in 2011–2013 (44 publications in 2011, 61 in 2012 and 64 in 2013). The key aspects of discussion were the

In: Russian Politics
Author: Philipp Trappl

reform. Th is part of the book concludes with a clear table outlining pension reform eff orts between 1990 and 2006. Chapter fi ve approaches the importance of growth and the creation of jobs within the EU and its member states, and explores the labor market in Greece. Job creation has been one of the top

In: Southeastern Europe

nents. Herein lies an important argument: that economic liberalism fails when it discounts culture, history and values. Indeed, it was Putiris recognition o f the symbolic importance o f the pension system, she argues, that enabled him to implement a new round o f pension reform in 2001. Here

In: Canadian-American Slavic Studies

pension system. More than any of the other reforms, it constituted a watershed in Russia’s welfare state retrenchment. The pension reforms affected different categories of citizens – current pensioners, those nearing retirement, current older and younger workers – differently. Younger workers are

In: Russian Politics

.1.2 The Reforms Russia underwent a comprehensive pension reform in 2002 that partially privatized the state pension system. At that point Russia transferred from a pay-as-you-go system in which active workers finance the pensions of current pensioners to a mixed system in which those born after 1967

In: Russian Politics

the early 2000s, 61 the failure of the pension reform launched during the same period 62 is a telling example. Changes in the tax system benefited the Russian state and its rulers soon after their inception, whereas the pension reform assumed benefits only in the long run, and generated

In: Russian Politics
Author: Katalin Szabó

Mdtyis: Facts and Recoflections (Tamás Bdcskai) ' . No. 6 PERMA.NENT PENSION REFORM? Foreword by the guest editor (Bod Peter) . Fultz, Elaine: Pension Reform in Hungary and Poland. A Comparative Review Augusztinovics, Maria, Robert Ivan Gal, Agnes Matits, Levente Mdt6, Andrds Simonovits and Janos Stahl

In: East Central Europe