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Eine Untersuchung anhand der Rechtsprechung der Römischen Rota
Das kirchliche Prozessrecht manifestiert sich in einem detailreichen Normenkomplex, der nur selten in den Blick wissenschaftlicher Untersuchung gerät. Grund genug, einigen Detailfragen Raum zu geben, die gleichzeitig paradigmatische Problemanzeigen für den gegenwärtigen Zustand kirchlicher Rechtskultur darstellen.Neben der eigentlichen Hauptsache können im kanonischen Prozess auch so genannte akzessorische Fragen auftreten, die von der Hauptsache abhängig sind, aber eine eigene richterliche Entscheidung verlangen. Die auf derartige Fragen fokussierte Untersuchung der Rechtsprechung der Römischen Rota offenbart einen höchst bedenklichen Zustand des geltenden Prozessrechts. Ist der Untergang des kanonischen Prozesses längst besiegelt?
Gesamtausgabe: Bände 1–4
Das neue, deutschsprachige Referenzwerk
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Zuverlässige und prägnante Informationen zu den grundlegenden Fragen des internen Rechts von Kirchen und Religionsgemeinschaften und des Religionsrechts.
Aufgrund der kirchlichen und gesellschaftlichen Veränderungen in den letzten Jahren stehen das Kirchen- und das Religionsrecht vor großen Herausforderungen und Modifikationen.
Die Herausgeber haben daher ein neues Lexikon für Kirchen- und Religionsrecht erarbeitet, dessen Ziel es ist, den Nutzern fundierte Orientierung und Informationen auf dem neuesten Stand der Forschung zum geschichtlich gewachsenen, geltenden eigenen Recht der Kirchen und Religionsgemeinschaften und zu deren rechtlichen Verhältnissen zum Staat zu liefern.
Das Lexikon für Kirchen- und Religionsrecht (LKRR) erscheint in vier Bänden, print und online in deutscher Sprache, und bietet in über 2,600 Lemmata bzw. Stichworten zuverlässige und prägnante Informationen zu den grundlegenden Fragen des internen Rechts von Kirchen und Religionsgemeinschaften und des Religionsrechts.
Ausrichtung und Ziel
Neben Fragen des staatlichen Rechts und des Kirchenrechts der katholischen und der evangelischen Kirche werden auch zentrale Inhalte des Kirchenrechts der orthodoxen Kirchen sowie des Rechts des Judentums und des Islams behandelt. Das Lexikon ist einer interreligiösen und ökumenischen Perspektive verpflichtet und eröffnet dem Anwender die Möglichkeit, die verschiedenen Rechtsbereiche zu vergleichen.
Die Mitarbeit von namhaften Wissenschaftlerinnen und Wissenschaftlern des staatlichen Rechts, des Religionsrechts sowie des katholischen, evangelischen, orthodoxen, jüdischen und islamischen Rechts garantiert fundierte und kompetente Informationen.
Das Lexikon ist sowohl für Theologen als auch für Juristen im Studium, in der Wissenschaft, in der staatlichen und kirchlichen Verwaltung sowie in der Seelsorge und beruflichen Praxis eine verlässliche und unerlässliche Informationsquelle.
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Dieses Referenzwerk ist auch erhältlich als Online Publikation.

The new German reference work
– print and online
– four volumes with more than 2,600 lemmas or keywords
– central terms in interreligious and ecumenical perspective
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Reliable and concise information on the fundamental questions of the internal law of churches and religious communities and of religious law.
Due to the ecclesiastical and social changes in recent years, church and religious law faces major challenges and modifications. That is why the editors have developed a new encyclopedia for church and religious law. It provides users with a wellrounded orientation and information on the latest state of research regarding the history and current state of laws of the churches and religious communities and their legal relations to the state.

The Lexikon für Kirchen- und Religionsrecht (LKRR) is published in four volumes, print and online, in German, and offers reliable and concise information in over 2,600 lemmas or keywords on the fundamental questions of the internal law of churches and religious communities and of religious law.

This new extensive reference work for church and religious law covers the state law and the ecclesiastic law of the Catholic and Protestant churches. Beyond that it also includes canon law of the Orthodox churches as well as Islamic and Jewish law.

For theologians and lawyers in academia, state and church administration as well as in pastoral care and professional practice, this lexicon, developed by renowned specialists, offers reliable and up-to-date information.

–fast and easy research because of digital availability without DRM –central terms in interreligious and ecumenical perspective –with over 2,600 lemmas or keywords one of the most extensive representations of the faculty

This reference work is also available as an online publication.
Der Glaube an Christus. Mit einem Vorwort von Patrick Becker
HerausgeberIn: Patirck Becker
Codices Sabaiticus 232 & Holy Cross 104, Jerusalem
HerausgeberIn: Panayiotis Tzamalikos
New text of Origen’s come to light
Origen’s Commentary on Matthew is perhaps his latest work, and reference to this was never made by his detractors. Instead, like modern scholars, they always pointed the finger at a garbled, untrustworthy, and heavily interpolated edition of his De Principiis, in order to cheerfully show how much of a ‘heretic’ Origen was. While Erich Klostermann, in 1941, compiled a series of fragments after having consulted twenty-four codices, he missed Sabaiticus 232. Which, though it is the most important of all, because it contains not only ‘passages’ ,but also unique flowing text from that commentary, (as the author demonstrates) is pretty later than the Contra Celsum. Professor Panayiotis Tzamalikos demonstrates that unless the correlations of Origen’s work to both Greek philosophy and subsequent Patristic literature are perused, it is impossible to recognise the real Origen. Considering the widespread and multi-faced miscomprehension (ancient and modern alike) of Origen’s thought, Professor Tzamalikos, by means of his commentary on this Greek text, demonstrates that this is a terra still calling for informed and unbiased exploration.

Abstract

Against the promise of free movement and mobility celebrated by the narrative of capitalism and globalization, the border stands as a stark reminder of the terrorizing history of death, destruction, and humiliation at the frontier. Like the Atlantic Ocean, home of the invisible and brutalizing memory of the slave trade, the Mediterranean and the Sonoran Desert today have become a dead zone, a dark trail of loss and sufferance amidst faint dreams of open lands and seas and freedom to roam. The growing militarization and securitization of the border unleashed by sophisticated technologies and algorithms of surveillance reflect a disturbing precariousness of empathy which seeks to conceal and banalize the trauma of crossing frontiers. By framing the debate of borders around security, threat and territory, the narrow calculus of border thinking multiplies and mutates beyond the physical spaces of the frontier, animating in the process a narrative of invasion, cultural purity, and territorial privilege. This article offers a critical reading of the politics, performance, and poetics of the border, border practices and border thinking in our current fractious conjuncture. Using the works of Caribbean poet and philosopher Edouard Glissant, I argue for a different interpretation and poetics of the border, one which does not nullify rootedness but refutes the tyranny of the “totalitarian root”. Under this alternative imaginary, the degeneration of borders into zones of non-being and the converse image of mobility as a human right force us to re-visit old fundamental questions about the distribution of the earth.

in Interdisciplinary Journal for Religion and Transformation in Contemporary Society

Abstract

In his book After Europe, the Bulgarian political theorist Ivan Krastev observes the ‘free fall’ of the dominant grand narrative in Europe after 1989, Fukuyama’s idea of the ‘End of history’. If we want to understand why we must pay attention both to the ‘periphery’ of this narrative, as well as to the periphery of Europe, where the recent movement of migration in the refugee crisis is experienced from a nationalist déjà vu mindset and not welcomed, we have to rethink the phenomenon of nationalism and patriotism, and the difference between the two. After a short phenomenology of the diverse combinations of ‘love’ (among other meanings the love for my patria) and ‘justice’, the author concludes that a strict separation of patriotism and nationalism is hardly possible. And even more fundamental, there will always be a tension between love and justice or, in philosophical terms, between the particular and the universal. Following Krastev, the autor holds that the contemporary rise of populist movements and of ‘illiberal democracy’ points to the crisis of a meritocratic idea of liberal democracy. One longs for a form of belonging that is not the result of our performance but that is unconditional, as Jean Améry argued in his reflections on the meanings of a homeland (Heimat).

in Interdisciplinary Journal for Religion and Transformation in Contemporary Society

Abstract

This article examines the significance of public space for the European project and reflects on the contribution of Christianity to the shaping of today’s public space. It is characterized by a common and shared symbolic, social, cultural, economic, political and geographical sphere that is potentially accessible and open to all people and welcomes creative participation. Today the specific task of Christianity consists not at least in the concretization of the idea of universal friendship in view of an ethos of empathy and inclusion which is perceptive of migrants and their narratives. The development of a amicable and non-hegemonic coexistence of Christianity, Islam and the secular world in Europe poses a particular challenge. In addition, it is necessary to make one’s own traditions and potentials fruitful in such a way that also the dead, who in the secular world are largely excluded, obtain a corresponding presence in the world of the living beyond nihilistic resignation. In this context it becomes apparent that the vocation of Christianity consists in providing an exit strategy to closed social and symbolic worlds. This exit includes the subversion of boundaries. It does not create an abstract boundlessness, but sets in motion a continuous process of creative openings and shifts in which public space becomes concrete as a place of ever new approaches, exits and inclusions.

in Interdisciplinary Journal for Religion and Transformation in Contemporary Society

Abstract

From 1933, the inner Protestant ‘German Christians Church Movement’ from Thuringia took control over some Protestant regional churches in Germany. For the German Christians the main motives of their agitation were the creation of a ‘volkisch’ belief system based on race, Christianity and ‘dejudaization’ (of Christianity).

Based on the theoretical considerations of spaces, boundaries and exclusion, the article uses the example of the German Christians to show under which conditions individuals are denied entry into an imaginary religious space. ‘Exclusivist border crossings,’ as this phenomena is named here on the theoretical perspective, can explain how religious arguments exclude people from entering a religious space such as salvation when the access criteria are linked to birth-related conditions.

in Interdisciplinary Journal for Religion and Transformation in Contemporary Society

Abstract

This article offers an interpretation of late modern social imaginaries and their relationship to religion and violence. I hypothesize that the transition from the ‘secular age’ to a so-called ‘post-secular constellation’ calls on us to critically reconsider the modern trope that all too unambiguously ties religion and violence together. Discussing the fault lines of a secularist modernity spinning out of control today on various fronts, I argue that the narrative semantics of the so-called ‘return of religion’ is frequently adopted as an imaginative catalyst for confronting these contemporary discontents – for better and worse. In linking recent work on ‘social imaginaries’ with Paul Ricœur’s discussion of the productive role of imagination in social life, I then explore the transformative potential of religious imagination in its inherent ambiguity. In conclusion I demonstrate that this quality involves a poietic license to start all over, one which can be used to expose both the violence of our beloved political ideals of freedom and sovereignty, as well as their repercussions on religious practice.

in Interdisciplinary Journal for Religion and Transformation in Contemporary Society